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Alex J. Esq.
Alex J. Esq., Attorney at Law
Category: Criminal Law
Satisfied Customers: 16449
Experience:  Experienced Licensed Attorney / Criminal Law Mentor
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A jailhouse snitch signs a deal saying he will provide useful

Customer Question

A jailhouse snitch signs a deal saying he will provide useful information in general for a criminal case for a reduced sentence. 5 days later this snitch is placed in a cell with a young 1st time offender. The snitch befriends the young man & tells him he should make a journal to try to show he is crazy & it would help his case. The snitch HELPS the young man fabricate a journal in 2 days & then says leave it to me. Takes the journal & uses that as his useful information to go with his deal to get a reduced sentence. So the man signed a deal before he even knew the young man. He needed to come up with information of any kind true or not to keep his end of the deal. Is that allowed? is that not entrapment? Can/should the fact that the snitch signed a deal before he even knew the defendant be used in the trial? Also how do they get away with using other inmates who are also in prison obviously because they have done something wrong (so they are no better than any other inmate in the same place) who have something to gain from the outcome. Why believe any inmate over another especially one who is willing to snitch to benefit his own situation. I think that is a poor choice & shows poor character. Maybe an undercover cop or someone who has nothing to loose or gain from anything.
Submitted: 5 years ago.
Category: Criminal Law
Expert:  Alex J. Esq. replied 5 years ago.
Hello. My name is XXXXX XXXXX I will be glad to help you.

This is done by law enforcement quiet often.

The biggest mistake inmates make is to share information that can be used against them with other inmates and or by phone, while incarcerated.

The Supreme Court has ruled that there is no expectation of privacy in jail or prison, so anything that is said or written, even under the impression that it is done in confidence is admissible in court.

Unfortunately the only thing that the defense attorney for the first offender will be able to do is to attack and challenge the credibility of the snitch during the trial, however there is no entrapment defense that would be applicable in a case like this.


Bonus and positive feedback are always greatly appreciated

Customer: replied 5 years ago.
Would the fact that the snitch signed a deal before he even met the defendant be a sign that he needed to find something to keep up his end of the bargain to get his reduced sentence? He had something to gain/loose from the defendants situation & was more than willing to make up anything he could to get his part of the deal done. The snitch would not even testify in court.
Expert:  Alex J. Esq. replied 5 years ago.
All of those facts can be brought up during trial, but as I said this is a very commonly used law enforcement practice and was ruled to be legal by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Any relevant facts can be brought up during the trial to show that the snitch was biased and was acting out of a self-interest.


Bonus and positive feedback are always greatly appreciated

Expert:  Alex J. Esq. replied 5 years ago.
Do you have any related follow up questions that I can answer for you?

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