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Josh Willis
Josh Willis, Computer Support Specialist
Category: Computer
Satisfied Customers: 16
Experience:  Systems administrator with over a decade of experience supporting various IT systems.
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Why do some of my burned DVD movies freeze near the end of

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Why do some of my burned DVD movies freeze near the end of the movie? The movie will be playing beautifully, and then near the end it will freeze. The freeze sometimes lasts only a couple of seconds or it may last until I get tired of watching the same freeze-frame for many minutes. I have tried cleaning the discs with window cleaner and this seems to help; sometimes it fixes the problem and sometimes only helps a bit with the freezing up. Any help or suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
TonyB

Josh Willis :

Hi there, I'm Josh. Let's see if we can get this figured out.

Customer:

OK i'm ready

Josh Willis :

My first question would be how many discs has this happened on, and are they all the same brand? I've run across this exact problem before with a bad batch of DVD's. They record fine, but when playing back content back from the outer edge (or reading files burned there) all of the data isn't there.

Josh Willis :

Also, what program are you using to burn the discs?

Customer:

Most of the DVDs are the same brand, but it happens on other brands also. I mostly use DVDneXt copy for burning the discs.

Josh Willis :

I've also seen this happen when burning discs at the maximum speed of the drive. So burning dvd's at 16X on a 16X burner for example. The rotational speed is the most towards the outside of the disc (which is the end of the movie) and occasionally the buffer in the DVD burner can't keep up on the max speed. Try lowering the burn rate one notch lower than whatever you're currently burning them at (so 12 instead of 16, etc)

Customer:

I haven't used any DVDs of that type. the greatest speed is 8x and most have been 4x

Josh Willis :

When you say the greatest speed, do you mean the speed the program is set to burn at, or the speed that's on the label of the container that the discs came in?

Customer:

Both

Josh Willis :

Interesting. Have you always had this problem with this DVD burner, or is it a fairly new problem for you?

Josh Willis :

How consistently do you run into this problem?

Customer:

This is a new devlopment. Not all discs do this, I'd say i out of 3 or 4

Josh Willis :

Ok. Doubt it's the burner itself, and I'm still leaning towards it possibly being defective discs as this is a fairly common symptom with discs, especially some of the more affordable brands. Let me research a bit further and see if I can come up with any other solutions for you though. I can tell you tough that there won't be anything we can do for the discs that have already been burned. The issue isn't in reading them, but rather in the writing process.

Customer:

Are you sure about that? I have re-burned some discs on the same brand and had no problem.

Customer:

Maybe I should mention that I have been using a lot of RW discs because I somehow ended up with a bunch of them. Maxelll

Josh Willis :

Yup, each disc will be a little different. If they're going to fail at all during the burning process, they won't consistently do so in the same spots. Basically every burn is a little different due to all sorts of variables (the load your computer is under, the content being pushed tot he discs, the quality of the individual disc, etc etc etc)

Customer:

So, Josh, do you think you will be able to help me or not?

Josh Willis :

AHH, that is probably it then. While RW discs are convenient since they can be erased and reused, they are MUCH more prone to burning issues, and you run into many more issues playing them in commercial DVD players

Customer:

Well I've used up all of those

Josh Willis :

In short, I'd recommend DVD-R discs, and burning at one speed under whatever they're rated at. So burn 8x rated discs at 4X

Customer:

OK will try that

Josh Willis :

Great. I'm pretty sure that'll get you running again. I ran into this issue myself several years ago when backing up a bunch of movies.

Josh Willis :

And obviously it's particularly since you don't even realize the problem exists until you get most of the way through a movie.

Customer:

What is the difference between DVD-R and DVD+R?

Josh Willis :

particularly frustrating that is.

Josh Willis :

they were competing formats when writable DVD's were first introduced. The industry has now pretty much settled on DVD-R as the standard, and this standard is what most DVD players today will reliably play

Customer:

That's what I thought

Josh Willis :

Yup, +R discs hold their information in multiple layers on the disc, where -R are a single layer similar to that of an old record

Customer:

OK

Josh Willis :

Well I hope I've helped answer your question today, but if you have ANY other questions about this issue at all in the future, feel free to come back to JustAnswer.com and click on the "My Questions" tab to get back to our conversation.

Customer:

Will do. Thanks/ Bye

Josh Willis :

Also, if you find that my suggestion has resolved your issue, I would be most appreciatve if you'd come back and click the accept button on this conversation, as this will allow JustAnswer to pay me for my services.

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