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NixDude
NixDude, System Administrator
Category: Networking
Satisfied Customers: 74
Experience:  20 Years in the trenches
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I have an aspire one, Linpus linux lite v 1.0.7.E. Little used

Customer Question

I have an aspire one, Linpus linux lite v 1.0.7.E. Little used and approx 8mths old. I cannot connect to internet. In Preferences, clicking 'networkcenter' does not do anything. Switch on front of computer is switched on. Wireless modem working with all other computers. Help please
Submitted: 8 years ago.
Category: Networking
Expert:  Freddy M. replied 8 years ago.
What type of wireless card do you have in the machine?

If you have a linksys wireless card it will not work they are not supported by linux. I would suggest replacing it with a belkin card as they work well with most linux OS.
Customer: replied 8 years ago.
Not satisfied I'm afraid. This computer came with it's existing wireless card and was working at first. It has not been used at all for some months and failed to connect aafter that.Also changing the card would not I think explain why I cannot open 'networkcenter'.
Expert:  NixDude replied 8 years ago.
Try removing the laptop battery with the ac removed. Let it sit several minutes with no power source available, then put the battery back in with the ac plugged in first and try it. I had what I think is a similar issue with one that had just glitched and froze the networking...let me know how that does for you...if it don't help it could still be hardware or perhaps software issues.
Expert:  NixDude replied 8 years ago.
You also said the network center don't run so I just realized your networking might have corrupted (maybe from a dead battery), try this, go to a console prompt and do a

rm -ri ~/.gconf/system/networking (no spaces from the ~ through networking!)

Or delete that directory by other means if you are not comfortable at the prompt (~ means home directory, so in a graphical environment look under the sub directories of your home directory)

Then when you restart you should be able to access the networking again, in fact that may be your whole problem.
Customer: replied 8 years ago.

Sorry, I do not know how to go to a console prompt;

press F1 or F2 as it is booting up?

 

nor do I have any idea how to 'delete that directory by other means'. I have already tried finding the networking sub directory through the graphical interface but not succeeded and if I did, should it really be deleted?

 

Is there a simple way perhaps to restore factory settings?

Expert:  NixDude replied 8 years ago.
Once you delete it, it should be recreated automatically when you go into the network center which should then work again. You will have to set up your network connections (such as auth keys) again for your wireless, etc. As far as console just hit CTRL-ALT-F2 for a full console from the gui (or ALT-ESC to cycle through if I got that wrong...or to get back to the gui do a CTRL-ALT-F7...sorry mine is at home but I think that is right off the top of my head...mostly use console only here) or you can run a terminal window as apposed to a full console prompt from the gui if you wish by doing a ALT-F2 and running something like xterm or gterm in the single command line.

The -i will ask if you are sure on every file, you can say Y to them, I did that in case you weren't too linux savvy, you can replace the -i with a -f if you are real brave and it will just quietly do it :). That is you can do a rm -rf ~/.gconf/system/networking if you don't want to confirm deleting it all...note that if you do the -f it will quietly do it, unless it has a problem.
Customer: replied 8 years ago.

Hmmm, thanks for this, but still not really enough for me to have a go without the likely chance of either getting nowhere or messing up the computer even more.

 

You are right, I am not only not 'too linux savvy'; I don't in fact have any idea about linux at all, and not much about computers in general, though I am usually able to follow the kind of directions which go " from the graphical interface (I assume this is what you mean by gui) press CTRL-ALT-F2

At the command prompt type rm -ri ~/.gconf/system/networking

then

Type Y and enter, for all files except the networking file (at which press N and enter)

then to return to the gui press CTRL-ALT-F7

I wouldn't want to try it though unless that really is right.

 

To replace the -ri with -rf sounds much easier but why does this need bravery? Is it because it may go wrong? Wipe the disc clean? Replace everything witha version from the republique francaise, marseillaise included? And as to running 'something like xterm or gterm' in a 'terminal wwindow' as opposed to 'a full console prompt', I'm afraid that leaves me up a creek without an outboard engine, and I doubt my paddle will get me anywhere.

I get the general gist but not enough to sort it out unfortunaely.

 

Expert:  NixDude replied 8 years ago.

Hmmm, thanks for this, but still not really enough for me to have a go without the likely chance of either getting nowhere or messing up the computer even more.

 

You are right, I am not only not 'too linux savvy'; I don't in fact have any idea about linux at all, and not much about computers in general, though I am usually able to follow the kind of directions which go " from the graphical interface (I assume this is what you mean by gui) press CTRL-ALT-F2


Yes, a gui is a graphical user interface, and you need to hit ctrl-alt-f2 from it. I verified that those are the correct keys last night.

 

At the command prompt type rm -ri ~/.gconf/system/networking then

Type Y and enter, for all files except the networking file (at which press N and enter)

 

Correct, but you can also say Y to networking, no need to say no to that one, the whole thing will be re-created

 

then to return to the gui press CTRL-ALT-F7

 

correct, you can also do a CTRL-ALT-DELETE and the system should shutdown and reboot gracefully from that prompt if you want, either way you end up right back in your familiar gui.

 

I wouldn't want to try it though unless that really is right.

Looks like you have the steps down. Linux unlike say windows is a lot less likely to go south even if you did do something wrong, it just might make it a little more difficult to fix, but it aint gonna go belly up from a user level.

 

To replace the -ri with -rf sounds much easier but why does this need bravery? Is it because it may go wrong? Wipe the disc clean? Replace everything with a version


As long as you have no spaces in the "~/.gconf/system/networking" part, you can use -rf without peril. And yes its easier, just demands you don't make a typo to avoid complications that might require a system restore, though again the requirement to go to a complete system restore from a user level is highly unlikely.

In a nutshell, this is about your best option short of a system restore, that is also an option though (even if you were to mess up this), so your are really not gonna loose much trying it. I think you got the jest of it, its just up to you whether you think you are up to it.

Don't worry I am gonna stick with you, even if something don't quite work as expected. Laughing

PS: I have one more idea, to make it seem less final, do this at the prompt instead of the rm command

mv ~/.gconf/system/networking ~/.gconf/system/networking.backmeup

that will move (rename really) your networking directory to networking.backmeup, that way you have a backup we can move back later should we want to. If you have no errors you will not see output from that command.