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Ron
Ron, ASE Certified Technician
Category: Chevy
Satisfied Customers: 33434
Experience:  35 years experience with ASE Certs
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Chevrolet Tahoe LT: The ac blows hot in the front and rear,

Customer Question

The ac blows hot in the front and rear, already replaced the ac compressor, reset the actuator and still no change? This is a 2004 chevy tahoe LT.
Submitted: 7 months ago.
Category: Chevy
Expert:  Ron replied 7 months ago.

Hello, my name is ***** ***** I am a professional here at Just Answer. I have noticed that your question was not getting a response and thought I would see if you still need help with this.I apologize for the delay and I hope I can still assist you with this here.

In order to determine the cause of the AC not cooling I need to know what the pressure readings your are getting with the compressor running, normal pressure on a full system needs to be right at 35 to 40 PSI on the low side and 200 to 225 on the high side. Post back with this information and we can work from there. Also if you place your hand on the accumulator with the system running is it getting nice and cold?

Customer: replied 6 months ago.
I got the ac compression tester, the low side says 40 psi, the high only says 50 and the accumulator is not cold at all?
Expert:  Ron replied 6 months ago.

The system is to low on Freon and that will keep the compressor from running, Normal operating pressure on a full system with the compressor running should be right at 35 to 40 PSI on the low side and 200 to 225 PSI on the high side. Static pressure (system off) should be right at 100 to 110 on both the high and low side.

Customer: replied 6 months ago.
I added more freon and the low side says 65 psi (too high) the the high pressure side still says 60 psi, accumulator still not cold?
Expert:  Ron replied 6 months ago.

Are these reading with the compressor running?

Customer: replied 6 months ago.
the compressor is running
Expert:  Ron replied 6 months ago.

Normal pressure on a full system with the AC compressor running should be right at 35 to 40 PSI on the low side and 200 to 225 on the high side. If you are reading 60 to 65 on both side that usually means the compressor has failed.

Customer: replied 6 months ago.
Ok, I have installed a new compressor already cuz the original failed, I also have a new accumulator in box on hand just waiting to install if that was the problem?
Expert:  Ron replied 6 months ago.

Anytime you replace the compressor you need to replace the accumulator , flush the system and replace the Orifice tube as well Did you do that?

Customer: replied 6 months ago.
No I did not, so I'll replace the accumulator as well now. What exactly is the orifice tube and how do I flush it?
Expert:  Ron replied 6 months ago.

You need to purchase a flush kit and remove the lines and flush the condenser, evaporator and all the lines with the flush solution. Actually your 2004 Tahoe has an expansion valve and it usually needs to be replaced when replacing the compressor. It takes the place of the Orifice tube. See it in the link below,

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/104923897/Expansion%20Valvve%20MAy%2028.pdf

Expert:  Ron replied 6 months ago.

By not doing so you could have very likely damaged the new compressor.

Customer: replied 6 months ago.
I'm having a hard time finding this expansion valve? And when I called to order it they said they only have a rear one?
Expert:  Ron replied 6 months ago.

It in the evaporator tube and the line has to be replaced , see step two in the link I sent you.

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