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Dr. B.
Dr. B., Cat Veterinarian
Category: Cat Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 19558
Experience:  Small animal veterinarian with a special interest in cats, happy to discuss any questions you have.
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Cleaning cat litter and noticed in one of the stools a blob

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Cleaning cat litter and noticed in one of the stools a blob of blood. He is a rescue, we think he is 4. We have had him for 3 years. He isn't eating the dry cat food, which he loves, but he is heating the soft stuff. He is overweight, but with 2 cats, hard to control. The other cat is 16 and thin.
JA: I'm sorry to hear that. The Veterinarian will know what to do. What is the cat's name?
Customer: Jackson
JA: Is there anything else important you think the Veterinarian should know about Jackson?
Customer: Nothing

Hello & welcome, I am Dr. B, a licensed veterinarian and I would like to help you today.

What the stool hard or loose?

How long has he been avoiding dry food?

Any retching, gagging, lip licking, drooling, or vomiting?

Are his gums pink or white/pale? Moist or sticky?

If you press on his belly, any tensing, tenderness, discomfort, or pain?

Could he have eaten anything harmful (ie bones, toys, plants, chemicals, human meds, etc)?

Customer: replied 6 days ago.
Stool was hard, which is his usual.
Avoiding hard food just today and yesterday
He was retching this morning. First time I'v seen that. Haven't seen any lip licking, drooling or vomiting
Won't let me check his gums
No discomfort or pain when I press his tummy. He lets me brush, pet, etc. when he is on his back
He is always eating plants outside.
I give him the yolk of an egg a few times a week. He had one this a.m.
He also ate the wet food.

Hello again,

Now we need to tread with care here. Jackson's avoidance of the hard food is something we can see with cats that have oral issues (ie dental disease, oral ulcers, etc) but given that he has been passing hard stools with a bit of blood we may actually have a colitis brewing here (where the blood is from the inflamed colonic wall and that inflammation can also trigger nausea in cats).

So in this case we'd want to start some supportive care to see if we can ease his fecal passage and with it his other signs. To do so, we can plan to start Jackson on a daily dose of OTC cat hairball medication (ie. Catalax, Laxatone, etc). This will lubricate the gut to facilitate the movement of hard feces out of the rectum. Though if we need to be more aggressive, we could also add a few milliliters of a GI lubricant (ie Miralax, lactulose or food grade mineral oil) orally. These can be mixed into his canned food. Though if you have to give this via syringe, do so with care to avoid aspiration ( since that would cause problems we'd best avoid).

Furthermore, we can also try adding fiber (ie canned pumpkin or a 1/4 teaspoon of unflavored Metamucil mixed into a bit of canned food) to his diet. Just like people, these can restore fecal output regularity.These are easiest to add to canned food and even though he loves dry, having him take some canned food is a good idea since it is 35% water and will help him avoid those hard stools. Similarly, we can try an increase fluid intake with cat milk or low sodium chicken broth.

Overall, we do need to tread with care for Jackson. If his stools have been hard then its likely this is triggering all of the signs we are seeing. So, we can use the above to ease his fecal passage and see if we can settle these for him. Of course, if that avoidance of dry continues for him then we'd want his vet to check his mouth/throat to make sure there is nothing more ongoing that we may need to address for him.

Kind regards,

Dr. B.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If you have any other questions, please ask me – I’ll be happy to respond.

**Please rate me by clicking on the **stars** at the top of the page as this is the only way the site credits me for helping you. Thank you!: )

Customer: replied 6 days ago.
I would like an answer! please

Hello again,

I actually answered you hours ago (about 10min after your last reply).

Since it seems like you are struggling to see that, I'll repost it now:

***********************

Hello again,

Now we need to tread with care here. Jackson's avoidance of the hard food is something we can see with cats that have oral issues (ie dental disease, oral ulcers, etc) but given that he has been passing hard stools with a bit of blood we may actually have a colitis brewing here (where the blood is from the inflamed colonic wall and that inflammation can also trigger nausea in cats).

So in this case we'd want to start some supportive care to see if we can ease his fecal passage and with it his other signs. To do so, we can plan to start Jackson on a daily dose of OTC cat hairball medication (ie. Catalax, Laxatone, etc). This will lubricate the gut to facilitate the movement of hard feces out of the rectum. Though if we need to be more aggressive, we could also add a few milliliters of a GI lubricant (ie Miralax, lactulose or food grade mineral oil) orally. These can be mixed into his canned food. Though if you have to give this via syringe, do so with care to avoid aspiration ( since that would cause problems we'd best avoid).

Furthermore, we can also try adding fiber (ie canned pumpkin or a 1/4 teaspoon of unflavored Metamucil mixed into a bit of canned food) to his diet. Just like people, these can restore fecal output regularity.These are easiest to add to canned food and even though he loves dry, having him take some canned food is a good idea since it is 35% water and will help him avoid those hard stools. Similarly, we can try an increase fluid intake with cat milk or low sodium chicken broth.

Overall, we do need to tread with care for Jackson. If his stools have been hard then its likely this is triggering all of the signs we are seeing. So, we can use the above to ease his fecal passage and see if we can settle these for him. Of course, if that avoidance of dry continues for him then we'd want his vet to check his mouth/throat to make sure there is nothing more ongoing that we may need to address for him.

Kind regards,

Dr. B.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If you have any other questions, please ask me – I’ll be happy to respond.

**Please rate me by clicking on the **stars** at the top of the page as this is the only way the site credits me for helping you. Thank you!:

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