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Dr. Karing
Dr. Karing, Veterinarian
Category: Cat Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 286
Experience:  General veterinarian with a special interest in internal medicine and emphasis on individualized care.
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MY 17YR OLD INDOOR CAT HAS DEVELOPED SWOLLEN NODULES ON

Customer Question

MY 17YR OLD INDOOR CAT HAS DEVELOPED SWOLLEN NODULES ON FRONT AND EACH SIDE OF HIS LEFT HOCKBONE. AFTER OVER $900.00 AT MY FELINE VET WHOM I DO TRUST, NO DIAGNOSIS. NEXT TEST FOR VALLEY FEVER AND MY SUGGESTION, CRYPTOCOCCUS. I FEED PIGEONS AND HAVE ONE CAT WHO DOES GO IN AND OUTSIDE. I HAVE NOTICE BIRD FECES TRACT IN THE HOUSE. ASPIRATED THE AREA AND SENT TO LAB . NO OBVIOUS SIGNS OF A PROBLEM. PUT HIM ON ZENIQUIN FOR 10 DAYS AS A PRECAUTION. STILL SWOLLEN AND NOW SHOWING SIGNS OF MORE OBVIOUS DISCOMFORT. I NEED ANOTHER VIEW FROM ANOTHER DOCTOR. THE SWOLLEN AREAS SEEM FIRM LOCALIZED ROUND BULBOUS AREAS ABOUT THE SIZE OF MARBLES. CAN YOU SUGGEST WHAT I NEED TO DO NEXT? THANK YOU
Submitted: 3 months ago.
Category: Cat Veterinary
Expert:  Dr. Karing replied 3 months ago.

Hi there,

I'm Dr. Karing and I would be glad to help with your question. It's too bad that the aspirate didn't yield any useful informationz: you may inquire if your vet thinks using a larger gauge needle with light sedation may allow for a better sample as this is the least invasive way to try and reach a diagnosis. Blood tests for valley fever and/or cryptococcus may very well turn up false negative results and those tests are expensive so I wouldn't pursue that unless cost is of no concern. An x-ray of the limb may help assess if there is bone involement but it is not useful in determining the cause of the problem which I agree is likley fungal or bacterial (i.e. especially mycobacterium). All that being said, beyond aspirating the mass to perform cytology, the next logical step is to remove an entire nodule or a wedge from a nodule surgically under general anesthesia and submit the tissue to a pathologist along with tissue bacterial and fungal cultures. The anesthetic procedure would likely be brief; however, it is wise to perform preanesthetic lab work (i.e. chemistry panel, complete blood count, urinalysis, thyroid test, FeLV/FIV viral tests) and chest x-rays beforehand to insure your geriatric cat is a good anesthetic candidate. It is possible the biopsied area may not heal well after surgery due to disease in the area, but if aspirating the sites yields no helpful information, then that is a risk worth taking in order to learn the cause of the problem and how to best treat it.

I hope that the information I provided has been helpful. Please remember to select REPLY TO EXPERT if you have more questions or would like additional information. It is my goal to provide you with the most complete information possible prior to you leaving a feedback rating. If you received all the information you needed, then kindly submit a rating.

Sincerely,

Dr. Karing

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