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Doc Sara
Doc Sara, Veterinarian
Category: Cat Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 952
Experience:  I am a dog and cat veterinarian with a lifetime of experience in our family veterinary hospital.
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Limping-walks with obvious pain. Etiology-hit sneaking thru

Customer Question

limping-walks with obvious pain. Etiology-hit sneaking thru sliding door. Local vet did x-ray and said surgery to evaluate and repair possible tendon tear. cost $400 plus. Can't afford. Would like to medicate with anti-inflam. and mild pain med with restricted activity. (Cat is "house" cat) Is there a medicine available that would suffice and would we need a script?
Submitted: 5 months ago.
Category: Cat Veterinary
Expert:  Doc Sara replied 5 months ago.
Hi there, I'm Dr. Sara. I'm a licensed veterinarian who works exclusively with cats and dogs. I'm sorry to hear that Pepper got bumped going through the sliding glass door and has been limping. I'll do my best to help. I'm glad to hear that X-rays were done - was there a fracture noted? What bones/joints are involved? In any case, if medical management is elected, unfortunately our options for control of inflammation are quite limited. Cats do not metabolize nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories well and all over the counter medications are either outright toxic or have a very narrow therapeutic range (meaning that it's easy to over dose and cause a toxicity). There are no FDA approved NSAIDs for long term use in cats. There is approval for two injectable products and one oral product but they only last three days. Some vets will prescribe a lower dose of oral meloxicam, but the FDA has placed a strict "black box" label on the product warning that its use has been linked to acute renal failure. However, the product has been used outside of the US successfully at lower doses than those that were initially used in the US and linked to renal failure. Some vets are more comfortable using it than others, so it's worth discussing with your vet. In terms of pain control, there are a couple of options. Both tramadol and gabapentin can be compounded with a prescription from the vet into appropriate "cat sized" doses. These medications can help significantly with pain, but unfortunately not inflammation. Thinking outside of the box a bit, if this is a ligament or tendon injury, it may benefit from the addition of a high quality joint supplement like Dasuquin or Synovi G4. Another product that can have beneficial effects in tendon and ligament injuries is an injectablie product called Adequan. Adequan is a purified preparation of polysulfated glycosaminoglycan that can aid in healing joint injuries. Lastly, therapeutic laser treatments are also frequently used to aid in both pain control and healing. If you ask the companies that make the lasers, they are the best thing since sliced bread. I put the laser in the class of "I'll try it if I want to go all out" and I've seen it work, but I also have seen it fail in places where I would have thought it would be great. Please let me know what questions I can handle for you.~Dr. Sara ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------My goal is to provide you with the most complete and accurate “five star” answer. If my answer isn’t what you were expecting, it’s incomplete, or you have more questions PLEASE REPLY to let me know what information you are looking for BEFORE giving me a negative rating! If my answer has been helpful to you, please show me by giving me a favorable rating. Thank you so much :)

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