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Dr. Gary
Dr. Gary, Cat Veterinarian
Category: Cat Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 19331
Experience:  DVM, Emergency Veterinarian, BS (Physiology)
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Concern is a catastrophic congenital condition as a older

Customer Question

concern is a catastrophic congenital condition as a older sib from former litter wound up with fever and pneumonia at 3 yrs old and went into respiratory failure in pet er. told probably a leukemia or something . this is 4yr
female.indoor. rescued and botle fed.
was fat lost weight over 3 months.loking bony along back a little.conjunctiva pink. eats wel.i tried letting cat bowl get empty to encourage weight los as she was obese. other 4 cats fine and not lost much weight. absolutely no other symptoms. thought her weight would stabilize but seems to be losing still.fur separating a little but she is not emaciated. i would say she is normal weight now. i am very woried.my phone number ***.***.****
Submitted: 11 months ago.
Category: Cat Veterinary
Expert:  Dr. Gary replied 11 months ago.

Hello. Thanks for the question.

It does sound like this is something like feline leukemia, FIV or FIP (feline infectious peritonitis). Those can be diagnosed based on bloodwork and viral testing. If this is FIV or Feline Leukemia, it can potentially be managed with antibiotics, steroids and nutritional management.

If this is FIP, then we usually see an elevated blood globulin level and fluid in the abdomen. If that's the case, the disease is 100% fatal. We can use steroids to get some response, but ultimately there is no effective treatment.

Here is some info on FIP:

http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&S=0&C=0&A=681

Let me know if you have any other questions.