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Dr. B.
Dr. B., Cat Veterinarian
Category: Cat Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 16268
Experience:  Small animal veterinarian with a special interest in cats, happy to discuss any questions you have.
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I have a 12-year-old Maine Coon who is diagnosed with

Customer Question

I have a 12-year-old Maine Coon who is diagnosed with hyperthyroidism (though we were told within the last six months that her levels are fairly low) who is getting very sick every four weeks.
She'll be fine for 3+ weeks and then suddenly she won't be able to keep any food down for several days. She continues to express interest in food, is drinking water and going to the bathroom but she's also getting sick 3-5 times a day. We don't see any fur balls in the majority of these instances.
In the past she just as suddenly will snap out of this and return to eating as normal.
Any idea what this could be?
E
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Cat Veterinary
Expert:  Dr. B. replied 1 year ago.

Hello & welcome, I am Dr. B, a licensed veterinarian & I would like to help you with your wee one today.

How long has this been going on?

Is her hyperthyroidism currently stable?

When were her bloods last checked?

Does she seem more likely to vomit dry then the soft foods?

Has her vet done any other testing for this (ie xray, scoping, etc)?

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
How long has this been going on?
- four monthsIs her hyperthyroidism currently stable?
- no. She's been allergic to all affordable options and I can't afford the radio iodine treatment.When were her bloods last checked?
- at least six months ago. It costs $300 every time I have her blood checked and ultimately I couldn't afford it any more.Does she seem more likely to vomit dry then the soft foods?
- more likely to vomit when getting soft food regularly.Has her vet done any other testing for this (ie xray, scoping, etc)?
-no.
Expert:  Dr. B. replied 1 year ago.

Thank you,

I am sorry to hear that that is the case.

Though if her hyperthyroidism isn't stable, then this is likely why she is still vomiting. We often see vomiting as a secondary sign of this disease in all species (even people). Since it is a chronic disease process, the GI signs can be intermittent but persistent as you have reported.

In regards ***** ***** here, I do think you need to ring her vet for a serious chat. While it is far from ideal to be adjusting her drug doses without bloods to guide us, they may be able to make an exception to try to get her stable to stop the vomiting and the effects the condition will be having on her heart and other organs. And it would be ideal for them to do this since they have assessed her heart function already and will know how severely elevated her thyroid levels are.

Otherwise, we'd have to consider supportive care for her. This usually means using only meals she tolerates and feeding them as small frequent meals with breaks to discourage vomiting. As well, you could also try her with a low dose of an antacid like Pepcid (More Info/Dose @http://www.petplace.com/article/drug-library/library/over-the-counter/famotidine-pepcid) or have her local vet dispense the low strength Zantac (More Info/Dose @ http://www.petplace.com/article/drug-library/library/over-the-counter/ranitidine-hcl-zantac) for her.

Overall, in this situation, Maya's vomiting is likely linked to thyrotoxicosis secondary to her unstable thyroid. Therefore, we'd need to have a serious word with her vet about trying to treat her within your means even if this means gently titrating her dose based on her clinical response and improvements. Otherwise, we can use small means and antacids to try to decrease this causing her such discomfort until that thyroid can be stabilized.

I hope this information is helpful.

If you need any additional information, do not hesitate to ask!

All the best,

Dr. B.

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