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Dr. Drew
Dr. Drew, Cat Veterinarian
Category: Cat Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 16846
Experience:  Small Animal Medicine and Surgery
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My 18 year old cat is leaking urine and his fur is continually

Resolved Question:

My 18 year old cat is leaking urine and his fur is continually wet. His skin is getting iritated. is there anything that can help him?
Submitted: 5 years ago.
Category: Cat Veterinary
Expert:  Dr. Drew replied 5 years ago.

Drew :

Hello, welcome to JustAnswer! I am a licensed veterinarian, and I'll be happy to help you in any way I can.

Drew :

Has there been any sign of weight loss, or excessive thirst?

Customer:

There has been some weight loss, bur the formula of food he was changed to is a lower caories urinary food. he does seem to be drinking more.

Drew :

OK, thanks. Do you notice any change in the way the hind legs are positioned while standing? Any wobbling, stiffness, or difficulty jumping?

Customer:

he dos have problems jumping but he has had that problem for about a year sporadically.

Drew :

OK, thanks.

Drew :

There may be a few issues going on here...

Drew :

Elderly cats are prone to kidney problems and diabetes, both of which can cause increased urine production and increased thirst...

Drew :

in some cases this can lead to an "overflow" condition in the bladder

Drew :

where urine fills up so quickly that the cat doesn't recognize the need to find the litter box

Drew :

this can be complicated by some degree of mental decline with age

Drew :

and also the possibility of spinal cord degeneration with age, or compression by bulging discs, leading to partial loss of sensation in the bladder, or control of the urinary sphincter muscles

Drew :

Usually, in a case like this, I'd start with testing the blood and urine for signs of the internal organ diseases mentioned above

Drew :

if that's all normal, then unfortunately this is likely to be something that is going to be challenging to treat

Drew :

The skin irritation may need to be treated symptomatically

Drew :

using antibiotic creams such as neosporin

Drew :

or sprays which are available from your veterinarian which will help to dry the area and prevent infection.

Customer:

I am taking him to the vet for testing but I wanted some background info. He is a cat that gets very upset when taken to the vet and they usually have to sedate him just to examine him. Are the sprays or neosporin non-toxic for cats since he will probably lick the area?

Drew :

Neosporin is essentially non toxic, but could cause mild stomach upset if ingested. A thin layer is all that should be applied.

Drew :

The spray, once dried, is not likely to present a problem. However, just licking the area is likely to cause irritation to persist

Drew :

And therefore, an elizabethan collar may be required in order to get the area to heal.

Customer:

OK. hopefully, he does not have anything that requires me to put him down. I know he is very old for a cat. He doesn't seem to be in pain and he is as greedy as he has always been.

Drew :

Hopefully it's something that can be managed. Diabetes is very treatable, if that's what's going on.

Drew :

Kidney disease is less so

Customer:

I read on line that I could use the human ketone urine strips to see if he was losing ketones /protein in his urine. Thr strip result was negative. I know he needs additional test to determine if he has diabetes Hopefuuly he does not have kidney disease. I had a cat that died from kidney failure Thank you for your info.

Drew :

yes, those strips are effective for detecting some ketones, but not all diabetics have ketones in the urine.

Drew :

kidney disease is unfortunately a frustrating illness, difficult to treat in late-stage cases.

Dr. Drew and 2 other Cat Veterinary Specialists are ready to help you