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Dr Rachel Moulton
Dr Rachel Moulton, Veterinarian
Category: Cat Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 139
Experience:  Practicing veterinary medicine for 13 years. 4 years in emergency medicine.
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My cat is walking slowly, tail down, kind of hunched down.

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My cat is walking slowly, tail down, kind of hunched down. He his a male Himalayan cross, approx 14 years old. He appears to be eating and using the litter box as normal. However, when I picked him up to cuddle him, he let out a yowl. He purrs when I pet him. At his age, could his kidneys be shutting down? Is there anything I can do?
Thank you for your post!

Is he drinking more than normal?

Peeing more than normal?

Eating ok?

Vomiting?

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Customer: replied 6 years ago.
I have not noticed him drinking more than usual or peeing more than usual, maybe even a little less. He has always been a picky eater, only likes one kind of food, Fancy Feast chicken in gravy, most of the time only licks the gravy! he will eat dry food sometimes. not noticing any 'unusual vomiting', as he occasionally throws up hair balls, despite any hairball preventative that I use.
Thank you for your reply!

From your post above, this does not seem to be a typical case of kidney failure as often with kidney failure signs would include:

- Drinking more
- Peeing more
- Eating less
- Vomiting
- Severe lethargy

Regardless, the signs do seems abnormal enough where I would recommend seeing your veterinarian - to consider not only an examination, but to check cell counts and organ values to ensure the kidneys are ok as well as the liver and other vital organs.
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The above is given for information only. Although I am a licensed veterinarian, I cannot legally prescribe medicines or diagnose your pet's condition without performing a physical exam. If you have concerns about your pet I would highly advise contacting your regular veterinarian
Customer: replied 6 years ago.
There is no vet nearby, otherwise I would have called one. Due to this being a weekend, that is why I chose this site. I do not disagree with your comments. I forgot to mention that he does not seem to be able to jumb up on my bed anymore. At first I thought he was just too fat. I need to know that if it is his kidneys or any other organ, at his age, will a vet be able to do anything for him? Can this be some sort of virus or bug? He does not go outside in the winter.

A lot of times when cats are refusing to jump and are holding their tails down it could be lower back pain. I suppose if he had a kidney infection but usually they are acting more sick than you describe....The problem is, he is an older cat so for me to make some recommendations about giving him pain medication you can find over the counter could cause him harm if he has early kidney disease or liver problems. One thing I could have you safely try is to start giving a glucosamine and chondroitin supplement. 250mg per day would be find. You can find this at many health food stores.

 

If this isn't working you might need to travel to a vet to have a blood test to check organ function to see if he can handle some medications and a physical to make sure lower back pain is truly the problem.

Dr Rachel Moulton, Veterinarian
Category: Cat Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 139
Experience: Practicing veterinary medicine for 13 years. 4 years in emergency medicine.
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