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Zaphod
Zaphod, Diagnostician, Trainer
Category: Car
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Experience:  14+ years on an automotive technical hot line; Top Gun Diagnostician award
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switch to manually lock up the converter in a np 2003/4 pajero did

Resolved Question:

how and where do i hook up a switch to manually lock up the converter in a np 2003/4 pajero did ?
Submitted: 2 years ago.
Category: Car
Expert:  Zaphod replied 2 years ago.

Zaphod :

The Pajero is the same vehicle as the Montero [here in the US] and the Shogun - it just depends on what country it was produced for. This vehicle came with two different automatic transmissions, a four speed INVECS-II or a five speed INVECS-II tiptronic. Each is controlled by the powertrain control module, but the wiring isn't the same. To be sure I get you the proper wiring information, I need to know which transmission the vehicle is equipped with?

Zaphod :

The connection to a switch is simple, and I would add a fuse to be safe. Essentially you need to interrupt the wire between the torque converter clutch solenoid [in the transmission] and the PCM. Wiring harness routing and connector locations differ between the two transmissions, and big harness connectors offer us sections of the harness more easily manipulated. Once the access point is determined we can install the switch. I would use a simple two terminal switch, with one wire connected to the transmission side of the circuit and the other to a good ground; a 3A fuse in either of the switch's wires is a good idea. With the switch in one position the PCM controls the ground that locks the converter. In the other position it locks. There are some potential issues you need to be aware of. The PCM may very likely set fault codes and move to a failure strategy. The following is from the USA Montero repair manual regarding this issue:

Zaphod :

"The transmission is locked into 3rd gear as a fail-safe measure, and the "N" range light flashes once per second."

Zaphod :

In addition to the information about the transmission, can you tell me why you want to do this? There are other options if you're looking for complete manual control over your automatic.

Zaphod :

I await your reply, Jeff

Expert:  Zaphod replied 2 years ago.
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Customer: replied 2 years ago.

HI AND THANKS FOR THE REPLY

IT IS A 3.2 DIESEL 5 SPEED AUTO AND I AM IN AUSTRALIA.

THE REASON I WANT TO HAVE MANUAL CONTROL IS I TOW A LIGHT WEIGHT CARAVAN AND IT WILL NOT LOCK UP AT ALL WHEN TOWING, AND IT REALLY AFFECTS FUEL ECONOMY AS ITS DOING ABOUT 500 RPM EXTRA EVERY MINUTE ALL THE TIME WHEN TOWING,AND THE TRANS OIL GETS VERY HOT BECAUSE OF THE CONVERTER SLIP.

EVEN WHEN NOT TOWING IT IS VERY SENSITIVE AND UNLOCKS IF YOU MOVE THE EXCELERATOR PEDAL EVEN A VERY SMALL AMOUNT.

MY LAST PAJERO HAD A V6 CHEVY AND TURBO 700 DRIVE TRAIN AND I HAD A SWITCH FOR ITS CONVERTER,, IT WORKED VERY WELL.

CAN YOU GIVE ME DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS AND DIAGRAM TO DO THE JOB MYSELF ? I DID THE TURBO 700 MYSELF SO I AM VERY CAPABLE OF DOING IT ,JUST NEED TO KNOW HOW WITH THIS ELECTRONIC BOX.

THANKS ......BARRY

Expert:  Zaphod replied 2 years ago.
Hi Barry, I'll get the wiring and related graphics for the connectors and post them shortly, along with the instructions.
The reason it won't lock when you're towing is the engine is under more of a load than the engineers thought the vehicle would see under steady conditions. This is the same reason it unlocks when you try and increase speed [or maintain speed up a hill]. If you have done the work you indicate, this should be really easy for you. As far as the tranny getting hot-watch out that the fluid does not start to smell burned-this would be the friction material in the tranny overheating. I'd suggest [if you're not already] using synthetic tranny fluid and/or an extra fluid-to-air cooler. Jeff
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

HI AGAIN

I HAVE FITTED AN EXTERNAL COOLER TO HELP THE HEAT WITH TOWING

AND THE FLUID IS NOT BURNT AT ALL SMELLS SWEET AS AND ISA A NICE COLOR.

LOOKING FORWARD TO DO THIS

THANKS....BARRY

Expert:  Zaphod replied 2 years ago.
The extra cooler is great, and it's good to hear the fluid is not overheating. Now for the project. The following are images of what I hope is your vehicle, they're from a 2003 USA Montero shop manual. The first shows the transmission with the harness, and the first connector [C-03] that the TCC circuit passes through. This probably isn't an ideal place to access it, but in cases where the interior of the vehicle has been customized sometimes it's prudent not to disturb this work. This image also shows the transfer case which you may or may not have.

Image 1
The TCC circuit is pin 7 in this connector, and the wire color is Yellow with a Red stripe. The color remains the same all the way to the PCM, which is the next image along with the connector [D-136].

image 2
If you pull off the lower kick panel over on the passenger side, you should be able to access this connector. Pin number 130 should be the same Yellow/Red wire. The internal wiring is the next image, and it identifies the TCC solenoid so we can tell which wire it's controlled by.

image 3


The TCC is the fourth from the left. You can also see the huge connector [E-114] that passes the electrical connections from the whole harness, but it's not in an easily access place nor is it an easy connector to work with>too many tightly packed wires. I would splice into the wire about six inches [15cm] or so from the PCM. This is not a high current circuit, and inside the vehicle behind the kick panel is an area that usually stays dry, so a Scotch-Lock splice would work well here. They look like this:


This has two channels; one that goes all the way through and one that's blocked at one end. The existing wire slides into the connector from the side, the unstripped wire that will go to the switch goes into the blocked passage. Next the metal blade connector is pressed into the plastic body, and as it goes in it slices through the wire's insulation and makes a connection between the two wires. Lastly, the cover snaps over the blade as insulation. I'd wrap it with electrical tape to be safe. Mount the switch [a simple on/off type] anywhere that's convenient. You can, but don't have to, use a 5 amp in-line fuse on either wire to switch. Connect the other wire from the switch to any good ground, some locations are in the next image.
image 4


Ground point 12 is just below the PCM, and it would be easiest to run the two wires from the switch to points that are near each other.
Now, with the switch in the "open" or "off" position, the PCM will control the TCC. In the other position it will lock the clutch at 100%. The PCM does not normally do this, it controls the TCC solenoid using brief connections to ground that vary in on-time duration-this is called pulse width modulation. If the PCM detects that the TCC remains locked for or ten seconds longer than it should be it will probably set a fault code 52 or 53, but there's no fail-safe strategy indicated in the diagnostics for these codes. Other codes that may set could include the gear ratio error codes for the forward gears 41-45. The ratio error codes have the same failure strategy as the 36 mentioned earlier.
That should be all you need to complete your desired task. If you have problems with the PCM setting codes and becoming stuck in 3rd gear, there is a way to control each solenoid individually with a switch. You can purchase a 'transmission test box' or make your own. The solenoids are controlled singly or in groups to obtain all the forward gears and reverse. In either case it turns the automatic into a manual without a clutch pedal. Test devices like this are used to diagnose transmission problems or to control the transmission for better performance such as in racing. Let me know how you make out, and good luck.
Jeff
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

HI JEFF

THANKS IT ALL SEEMS TO BE EASY ENOUGH TO DO .

I WILL GIVE IT A GO IN THE NEXT FEW DAYS AND LET YOU KNOW

THANKS AGAIN....BARRY

Expert:  Zaphod replied 2 years ago.
If it works out, don't forget to click on ACCEPT. I await your reply, Jeff
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

HI AGAIN

I HAD A LOOK AT IT MYSELF AND COULDN'T WORKOUT WHICH COMPUTER TO TAP INTO

SO I TOOK IT TO AN AUTO ELECTRICIAN AND HE SAYS THE COMPUTER PLUGS ARE DIFFERENT TO THE ONE IN YOUR PICTURES ,THE PIX ATTACHED ARE OF MY COMPUTERS ,THEY ARE BEHIND THE LEFT HAND KICK PANEL,AND ARE PIGGYBACKED ON EACH OTHER,, AND HE SAYS NONE OF THE PLUGS MATCH UP WITH YOUR PIX, ALSO BOTH COMPUTERS HAVE YELLOW/RED WIRES COMING OUT OF THEM

ALSO WHY DO THE KITS AVAILABLE ON EBAY HAVE RELAYS ATTACHED TO THE WIRING ?. ANY HELP WOULD BE GREAT .......THANKS........BARRY

graphicgraphic

Expert:  Zaphod replied 2 years ago.
Hi Barry,
Thanks for letting me know you're having some difficulty. It seems there is a difference between the USA and Australia versions of the vehicle. Silly me even forgot that you're in 'left-hand-drive' territory which would put the PCM on the other side of the vehicle. It's also possible that you have a pair of computers, one for the engine [ECM] and another for the transmission. We don't want to start guessing at which yellow/red wire is the correct one. A harness repair job I repaired had two like colors switched; one was for the right front turn signal light and the other was cruise control accelerate solenoid-owner was lucky she didn't crash.
Ultimately we can tap in at the transmission harness connector. Let me do some digging to see if I can find a different diagram. If not then we would need to check the transmission harness connector to see if it's the same shape as the illustration, and if the Y/R wire is in the expected location. I'll post again within 30 minutes of this post.
Expert:  Zaphod replied 2 years ago.
Hi Barry, I'm downloading a couple of Pajero service manuals which ZI think will answer the questions, but the connection is very slow and it's estimated it will take about 45 minutes to an hour. Oh, and that should read 'not in left-hand-drive...'.
Jeff
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
THANKS, XXXXX XXXXX LOOKING FORWARD TO WORKING OUT THIS PROBLEM
Expert:  Zaphod replied 2 years ago.
The manuals are coming from a site somewhere in Russia and they're taking forever. Can you tell me if those modules are labeled engine or transmission? It looks like the one with four connectors is the A/T ECU and I'm betting the other is for the engine. The first manual I got is for 2001/2002 and it lacks the diesel variation. It also shows two 5 speed automatic transmissions, both with a locking converter. On the diagram for the 6g7 the DCC solenoid circuit is in pin 107, on the diagram for the 4m4 it's in pin 15. Can you tell me what model transmission your Pajero has?
I'll keep you updated on my research, and I'm sure we'll get this completed.
Jeff
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

HI AGAIN

THE COMPUTER MODULES ARE NOT LABELED , THE TRANS IS 5 SPEED .. . . I THINK IT IS A V5A51-7-AA RE, RH. [i googled 2004 pajero transmission]

THE VIN NUMBER IS... JMFLYV78W4J000852... THIS MIGHT HELP ?

THANKS....BARRY

Expert:  Zaphod replied 2 years ago.
Ok, I have obtained a factory UK shop manual that contains information relative to the 3.2L diesel engine, and wiring for LHD and RHD versions:
graphic

This engine has the designation 4M4/4M41 and it is a diesel [the last manual was not OEM and it indicated that the 4M4 was gasoline powered]graphic

The transmission is as you said, the V5A5 and it's computer is the Engine ECU:

graphic

Oddly, the instructions in the next image indicate this equipment is on the left side of the vehicle but they don't match the illustration. Part number 7 is the A/T ECU with three connectors, and it's piggybacked on the Engine ECU which has four connectors.

graphic


Now for the wiring. What we call the TCC/torque converter clutch [here in the US] is labeled DCC in this manual. The diagnostics for the DCC solenoid circuit fault code 36 tells us what pin at the computer we need to locate [15]:



graphic

The connector pinout illustration for the 4M4 A/T ECU shows the three connectors in position, and it numbers the cavities - not all will have wires.

graphic
Pin 15 is fairly easy to access.

Updated information: the fuse suggested was a bit small as the normal solenoid resistance is 2 to 4 ohms. With a charging system voltage that may reach 16v, the current in this circuit could reach 8 amps. This answers your question regarding 'kits' that use a relay-relays are used to switch large currents on and using a small amount of current in the control circuit. I would use a 10A fuse to protect this circuit, and a simple on/off switch. Should you desire to use a relay, it's wiring is quite simple. A typical relay will have 4 or 5 terminals. These are usually labeled or numbered with European circuit designations. The business part of the relay usually has these three terminals; 30=B+ (direct battery power or switched ignition power), 87=NO contact (normally open, not connected to terminal 30, off when relay is not turned on), 87a=NC (normally closed, on or connected to terminal 30 when relay is turned on). The control side of the relay has two terminals, 85 and 86. There are two styles of your typical 5 pin relay; plain and spike protecting. A relay is operated by a coil that we run current through to create a mini magnet. When this current is turned off, the magnetic field collapses and this generates a tiny voltage spike. Some OEMs use spike protection relays and these require a bit of attention. Note the diagrams on the following two pictures:
Plain:
graphic
Protecting:
graphic

On the plain style, we don't need to worry which of the control pins is power and which is ground-it will work fine either way. There's no electrical connection between the control and switch parts of the relay inside. Note, however, on the second picture, that terminal 86 is labeled + and 85 is - so it's important that power goes to 86 and ground to 85. If it's backwards, the little diode (protection device) inside will pop the first time it's turned on but the relay will keep working.

Oy. Well I think that covers it all. If I left something out please let me know. Jeff
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

HI JEFF

I DID ANSWER A COUPLE OF DAYS AGO BUT WHAT I WROTE SEEMS TO BE GONE .

ANYWAY I MUST BE A DUMBASS AS NOW I AM REALLY CONFUSED

TO START WITH ARE WE STILL USING THE YELLOW/RED WIRE ?

AM I EARTHING IT OUT .OR HAS THE EARTHING IDEA GONE ?

AND NOW WE ARE PUTTING 12 VOLTS VIA A RELAY TO TERMINAL 15 IN THE BIG BLOCK OF WIRES ?

AND IF I AM , IS IT TO BE SPLICED IN AND NO CUTTING OF THIS WIRE ? SO 12V IS PUT TO THAT WIRE WHEN THE SWITCH IS ON ?

AND DOES IT MATTER THAT VOLTAGE WILL BE GOING BOTH WAYS IN THAT WIRE ?

CAN YOU DO ME A DRAWING OF THE CIRCUIT IN EASY TERMS ?

THANKS.....BARRY

 

Customer: replied 2 years ago.

HI AGAIN

PLEASE READ MY LAST REPLY ,AND HOPEFULLY PUT ME STRAIGHT.

BARRY

Expert:  Zaphod replied 2 years ago.
Hi Barry,
Unless you're used to this type of work it can be confusing. In fact, most automotive technicians shy away from electrical work because they really don't understand it. I've been trying to scan a diagram I drew up but modern technology isn't cooperating. I'll have to photograph it and then upload that instead.

Essentially what we need to do is splice into the wire at pin 15 of the transmission computer - this is the computer with three connectors. I don't have a wire color, the manuals I have located with the diesel engine do not include the wiring diagrams so we will have to go by location. This wire we've added will run to a switch; a simple on/off switch with two wires or terminals. The other wire from this switch will go to ground.

graphic

You can add an in-line fuse holder to either wire: the one from the ECU to the switch or the one from the switch to ground.
Using a relay makes it more complicated but not impossible [I have faith in you, Barry].
A typical 5 terminal relay and a wired connector it plugs into should be available at any auto parts store. The following should explain how to connect the relay and where the terminals are on the relay.
graphic

When using a relay, you can use a fuse or not. The relay itself, the 'control' half, should use less than one amp; so the power supply wire to the relay terminal 86 does not need a fuse nor does the wire from terminal 85 to the switch or from the switch to earth. The fuse would go into the wire from the ECU to the relay. With the ignition turned on, power is fed to the relay coil at terminal 86, then to the switch and then to earth. Control power from the splice into the wire at the A/T ECU pin 15 will be fed to [a 10A fuse or directly to] terminal 30. When the switch is off [or open] the relay contacts [it's internal switch] are also open and there's no ground path for the solenoid control circuit. When the switch is turned on [or closed], current flows through the coil making it a magnet. The magnet pulls on a steel plate inside the relay, moving the terminal 30 contact off of 87a and onto 87. Since terminal 87 is earthed, this turns on the solenoid.

A switch is far easier, and a fuse helps to prevent all of that "magic smoke" from getting out of the wires. I hope this makes it understandable; if not please let me know. Jeff
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

HI AGAIN

OK NOW IT IS VERY SIMPLE I WILL TRY IT TOMORROW ,

I DON'T KNOW WHY YOU WOULD USE A RELAY WHEN YOU DON'T HAVE TO

AND LET YOU KNOW HOW IT GOES AND WHAT COLOUR TERMINAL 15 IS

THANKS...BARRY

Customer: replied 2 years ago.

HI JEFF THERE IS A PROBLEM

I HAVE HAD IT HOOKED UP AS PER INSTRUCTIONS

BUT IT LOCKS MOMENTARILY THEN UNLOCKS AND THE NEUTRAL LIGHT ON THE GEAR INDICATOR STARTS FLASHING ONCE EVERY SECOND AND DOES NOT STOP TILL THE IGNITION IS TURNED OFF AND RESTARTED, THE FOUR WHEEL DRIVE INDICATES IT IS IN LOW RANGE 4X4 WITH CENTRE DIFF LOCKED .BUT ONLY FOR A WHILE ,[IT STOPS AFTER A WHILE]

HAVE A LOOK AT ebay.com.au AT ITEM NUMBERS 250923660970 AND 280865994022 .

thanks.....BARRY

Expert:  Zaphod replied 2 years ago.
Hi Barry, I mentioned the possibility of the ECU detecting a problem and jumping into fail-safe mode. In your system, the A/T ECU turns off the A/T relay which is the power source for all of the solenoids. The result is the default mechanical/hydraulic control built into the transmission. In many it's 2nd gear, in others it's 3rd - it depends on the gear ratios. The fail-safe gear will allow the vehicle to move away from a stop [but not quickly enough for those behind it] and to attain a highway speed [but the engine will be revving high]. It allows one to drive the vehicle, and not be left stranded. Those two 'kits' are FAR too expensive to be just a switch or a switch with a relay and fuse. I've emailed both of the sellers asking them how they prevent fault detection-perhaps that price includes another ECU. If I were to spend that much I would try to see if the ECU can be reprogrammed or have it's current programming altered. This is known as "tuning your computer" and is fairly popular among the street racing crowd here in the US.
Another option is to supersede the ECU completely by building or buying a 'test box'. I've built two; one setup simply used a switch for each solenoid but there were only four solenoids we desired control over so wiring was easy. The other used a rotary switch to control five solenoids in order to obtain reverse, 4 forward gears and a locked converter. Both of these vehicles set codes, but the computer was electrically disconnected from the transmission so it became impossible for the computer to engage any fail-safe strategy.
I'll post here what the sellers tell me. I sent a personal email to the first listing, and 'asked a question' of the seller on the second so you may be able to see my question there.
Jeff
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

HI

I SENT A MSG TO SOMEONE WHO BOUGHT ONE OF THESE KITS

HE SENT ME BACK INFO FROM THE KIT

I WILL TRY TO ATTACH IT , AND MAYBE YOU CAN TELL ME WHERE THE RESISTOR CONNECTS TO

MY CAR DID NOT GO INTO LIMP MODE IT JUST UNLOCKED THE CONVERTER AND STARTED THE N LIGHT FLASHING AND THE L 4X4 LOCK LIGHT TO BE ON.

Attachment: 2012-04-20_111211_pajero_lockup_wiring_from_ebay.pdf

graphic

THANKS.....BARRY

Expert:  Zaphod replied 2 years ago.
Hi Barry, this is the reply I got from one of the sellers, the other hasn't replied yet:
"The kit is of course more than a switch. No ECU fault will be detected when engaged. I have the kit installed in my vehicle, amongst others, with no issue. Why have you assumed this won't work as described?
As any other customer you are afforded protection under Ebay for products that don't work as described & for that matter under consumer protection laws.
I don't have any interest to disclose the detailed design of the product, I don't see the need.
You are welcome to purchase or shop elsewhere.


- autoimports0000"

They're not giving up any detailed information, and I can't tell you for sure where to connect a resistor. Perhaps you can get more of the installation instructions, but I suspect they are electrically isolating the lockup solenoid and substituting a resistor of the same value [2.4 to 3.7 ohms, 80-100 watt], and that this rather large resistor is buried in the kit wiring harness. If the power [watt] rating isn't high enough it will get very hot and burn out - at the very least this stinks.
When the -ECU has the solnoid off, it passes (and will continue to pass) one diagnostic test if the circuit voltage is above a certain value. When the ECU has it turned on, another test passes if the voltage remains low. Swapping a resistor or another solenoid into the wiring would allow these tests to pass, while allowing something else to control the lockup solenoid. One could also use another solenoid and it would only have to be electrically sound; it could be mechanically stuck or clogged. The wiring becomes only a bit more intricate, as now one would have to supply a power feed to the solenoid in addition to the grounding switch. If there's no fuse in the grounding side of the solenoid, there should be one in the power supply side - this is where fuses are normally located.
"Limp mode" is the same as "fail-safe": the unlocking of the converter and the flashing N light would occur in this mode when the ECU has detected any one of a number of electrical or gear ratio faults. Some transmission controllers have incredible diagnostic routines capable of detecting minor flaws, but these are usually controllers that also run the engine's systems. A/T only controllers are much more simple.
Let me know how the battle goes, Jeff
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

HI AGAIN

SEE THIS NEW ATTACHMENT THE OTHER BUYER SENT ME AND SEE IF U CAN WORK OUT WHERE THE RESISTOR GOES,, IT MIGHT HELP, IT SEEMS TO GO ON 2 OF THE RELAY TERMINALS,

Attachment: 2012-04-22_102753_pajero_wiring_22222222222222222222.pdf

 

I HAVE THOUGHT AND THOUGHT ABOUT THIS FEEDBACK PROBLEM, HOW ABOUT CUTTING THE ECU WIRE AND PUTTING IT THROUGH, A 2 WAY SWITCH WITH THE WIRE FROM TRANS TO THE MIDDLE TERMINAL ON THE SWITCH AND ,EARTH ON ONE SIDE AND ECU TO THE OTHER SIDE TERMINAL, THIS WAY WHEN THE SWITCH IS ONE WAY IT CONNECTS THE ORIGINAL WIRING UP AND WHEN SWITCHED THE OTHER WAY IT EARTHS THE TRANS SIDE OUT WITH NO FEEDBACK TO THE ECU. THE RESISTOR COULD JUST BE FOR THE LIGHT WHEN USING A RELAY TO SWITCH THE WIRES FROM ECU TO EARTH.

the relay could be a 2 way relay and do the same thing as a 2 way switch

??????????? BARRY

 

 

Expert:  Zaphod replied 2 years ago.
Hi Barry,
From the instructions it seems the kit uses at least two relays, a resistor and a indicator switch. With the switch in one position the system is electrically normal. In the other position the ECU is probably disconnected from the solenoid and connected to the resistor instead [which would need it's own power supply], and the solenoid is connected to earth. There is a 'double relay' used by several manufacturers which is two separate relays in one housing, and there are numerous types of switches and wiring schemes one could design to accomplish the task. Because the circuit is intended for a vehicle that has electronic controllers in it, it would be safer to use relays with the "spike suppression diode" built in. You could use a dpdt [double pole double throw, or 6 terminal] switch instead of the relays, but a voltage spike would be created each time the solenoid were turned off. The diode [one-way electrical valve] routes this spike to earth. The 5 pin relays have two contacts inside just like a double-throw [3 terminal, single pole double throw or spdt] switch; one pair that's connected when the relay is off [30, or the center connection, and 87a on one side of the switch] and the other is connected when it's on [30, the center connection, and 87 or the third switch terminal]. It's doubtful that the resistor is for the light: the 12v light bulb and lighted switch family is huge and don't need resistors. If the light source were an LED then the resistor would be tiny and not described as a "resistor block". A resistor block is typically used for electric radiator or condenser fans to lower the speed; they're large ceramic blocks about 11-13mm square and 50-70mm long. In much older vehicles they were used for the ignition system and often called ballast resistors. What you would be paying for in the kits is their 'engineering cost' of the product.
Do you think you could design or wire together something like this?
Jeff
Expert:  Zaphod replied 2 years ago.
Here's something I just drew up using an online circuit designer. Have a look at this and let me know if you have any questions, Jeff

graphic
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

HI MIKE

MAYBE WER'E GETTING SOMEWHERE NOW.

I HAVE USED A DOUBLE RELAY IN THE PAST TO ACTIVATE UP / DOWN ON A 12V ELECTRIC ACTUATOR RAM.

I WILL SEE MY NEPHEW WHO IS AN AUTO ELECTRICIAN ABOUT THE SETUP. .

IT LOOKS EASY ENOUGH TO DO .

I WAS AT AN ELECTRONIC SHOP TODAY ASKING ABOUT RESISTORS ,THAY COME IN DIFFERENT VALUES / SIZES, WHAT VALUE / SIZE DO I NEED ??

[ OR WOULD A DIODE IN THE SWITCH IDEA WORK BY STOPPING FEEDBACK SPIKES AS THEY TOLD ME ELECTRICITY ONLY TRAVELS ONE WAY THROUGH A DIODE ] ???

WOULD IT HURT ANYTHING MAINLY ECU IF I TRIED THE 2 WAY SWITCH ?

THANKS.....BARRY

Expert:  Zaphod replied 2 years ago.
Hi Barry,
Connections on a double relay would be the same as it's just two relays in one container. The setup for the ram was used to reverse polarity, which differs from the TCC setup which swaps components [the resistor for the solenoid]. The resistor needed must be the same value as the solenoid, and it must be able to carry the same current for long periods without getting hot. At 14.5v a 2.4 ohm device would place the current at 14.5/2.4=6.04 amperes. 14.5V*6.04A=87.6 watts. This would be a maximum power rating value and the one to look for. The lower the power rating, the less the resistor will be able to dissipate heat and the more likely it will get hot enough to smoke insulation or electrical connections.
Here's a typical power resistor/ballast resistor:

graphic
It's just a precise length of wire, that's a certain diameter, wrapped around some high temperature insulation [usually fiberglass] inside a ceramic housing.
graphic
They're usually installed where there's a lot of air flow to keep them cool. An auto parts store should have a variety of these for $5-$8AU; as they're used for older ignition systems and radiator/condenser fans.
Based on my experience with Mitsubishi ECU's in the US, I would opt for the relay with the diode inside. Of all the vehicles I've worked on, Mitsubishi's seemed to be the most sensitive to errant spikes-even those caused by jump starting. Adding a diode to a switch-only circuit means you have to install it properly, and if it's backwards it will likely burn out on first use-you won't be able to tell except maybe by the smell [which you will never, ever forget] or 'pop' or perhaps it's melted appearance.
When we move electrical energy through a coil of wire, a magnetic field is created. When the juice is switched off, this field collapses onto the coil. As these magnetic lines of force pass over the copper wire in the coil, a voltage is generated-much higher voltage than normal. It exists only for a brief instant, but it may peak at 300v, which is enough to permanently "upset" expensive electronics. The diode forces this spike to earth safely by giving it an easier path.
There are many different types of diodes that have vastly different electrical characteristics; using the wrong type will render it's installation ineffective or possibly prevent proper circuit operation or even cause damage. While it's fun to experiment, I'd rather not do it when there's a $1,000 ECU involved.
Nobody can say anything other than "maybe, maybe not", regarding damage to an ECU from using a switched coil circuit connected to that ECU. OEM's like Ford started using them in their systems to alleviate the cost of ECU replacements under warranty.
Let me know how the 'battle' goes. Jeff
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

HI

I SAW MY AUTO ELECTRIC NEPHEW YESTERDAY AND HE WILL DO IT NEXT WEEK HAVE A LOOK AT THE ATTACHED PIX THAT SHOWS THE RESISTOR ,

IT IS THE SAME ONE HE USES AS AN EXCITER FOR AN ALTERNATOR , AND HE SAYS THE WIRING IS QUITE EASY AND IS MAKING IT READY TO HOOK UP FOR ME .

ALSO MY NEPHEW PHONED AN AUTO TRANS FRIEND OF HIS WHEN I WAS THERE AND HE SAID DONT DO IT AS IT WILL WRECK THE CONVERTER WHICH IS THE WEAKEST PART OF THE DRIVETRAIN ON THE NP.

BUT EVERYTHING I HAVE READ IN FORUMS IS ALL POSITIVE .

I WILL STILL DO IT ANYWAY BECAUSE I THINK ITS A GREAT IDEA.

ALSO CAN THE PROGRAMING OF THE COMPUTER BE ALTERED TO NOT BE SO SENSITIVE TO THROTTLE MOVEMENT ?

WHAT'S YOUR THOUGHTS ON IT WRECKING THE CONVERTER ?

THANKS BARRYgraphic

Expert:  Zaphod replied 2 years ago.
Hi Barry,
As long as the resistor measures within range of the solenoid it should work; check it after it's been in use to see if it's getting hot.
Locking converters were never designed to be used under heavy or full throttle conditions-especially in diesel applications where engine torque vibrations are intense.
As long as you're careful it should work ok.
One must remember that a technician's opinion is based on his experience- what he's been directly and indirectly exposed to. You have seen many satisfied users, he's seen destroyed converters. I'll tell you what I used to tell the people who I spoke with on the hot line. I had three regular customers, each in the midwest US, each a shop owner [30, 35, 45 years]. Each one was steadfast in their opinion of the maker of the best US car [Ford, GM, Chrysler], however this was specifically due to their having each seen less than a dozen of these vehicles in their entire career. In their respective locations these rarely seen vehicles were available at locations too far to be realistic. One must, therefore, always consider the source of the opinion, but there's no doubt that this will stress the converter if used under sustained heavy throttle conditions.
Reprogramming a PCM is possible, this is called "tuning" in street racing lingo, and it's becoming more popular. There are many electronic devices that are designed to do a wide range of tasks. Some will only alter a few specific items such as boost, rpm or vehicle speed limits. Others allow more in depth control of fuel delivery, injection/ignition timing and other engine controller systems. I have not seen any that will work with an A/T only ECU; these controllers are very limited in their function and though it might be possible if the ROM chip were a generic type it would probably be cost prohibitive. Manufacturers don't easily give up their programming code-know any hackers?
The throttle position sensor is shared between the engine and A/T controllers; it may be possible to connect a potentiometer [volume control] to the A/T ECU directly. This would allow you to 'dial in' a setting: at one end [low volume/light throttle] the upshifts would typically be early and soft, at the other end they'd be later and harsher. The installed programming is the engineer's best guess at how and when the transmission should shift for anyone who might drive the vehicle under any conditions. Sometimes operators experience long duration conditions that cause maddening behavior from A/T computers; jumping up two gears, slamming downshifts, converter shudder are just a few.

Let me know how it works. Jeff
Zaphod, Diagnostician, Trainer
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