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Dale Stockstill
Dale Stockstill, Automotive Diagnostic Technician
Category: Car
Satisfied Customers: 1238
Experience:  40 years of Automotive Technical Knowledge, Teacher, Diagnostic Specialist
19741685
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my 1993 plymouth duster cranks over good but has no spark &

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my 1993 plymouth duster cranks over good but has no spark & the fuel pump is not running?

Hello,

 

My name isXXXXX is your name?

 

Does your Duster have a 4 clydr or V-6 in it?

 

Did this happen all at once? Like when the engine was cold and you went to start it?

 

Let me know and I will try to help you get her going.

 

Sincerely,

Dale

 

 

Customer: replied 7 years ago.

Hello, my name is XXXXX XXXXX work as a heavy euiptment mechanic myself. John deere & kubota mostly. my duster has a 2.5L 4 cylinder in it. i drove it into work and parked it for the day, then when i came out it would not start. i have checked coil feed wire and have no voltage there with the engine cranking or with the key in run position. i pulled the fuel lines off the throttle body and have zero flow with key in run position? this did happen all at once with the engine cold. thanks.

OK Josh.

 

Do you have it home where you can work on it? Or is it still up there in the parking lot?

 

If it will crank over and you say it has not voltage to the primary (which would be the + side of the coil) Here is the ignition system that is in you car:

 

 

Some of these Pictures will match your system and some will not but they should give you an idea of how to trace out the system.

 

I do have the complete wiring schematic of your car if you need it.

 

Sincerely,

Dale


1988–96 ELECTRONIC DISTRIBUTOR IGNITION SYSTEMS
General Information
CHRYSLER IGNITION SYSTEM
The engine speed input is supplied to the PCM by the distributor pick-up. The distributor pick-up is a Hall effect device.

Fig. 1: The internal shutter (interrupter) mechanism of the 2.2L EFI and 2.5L EFI engines



Fig. 2: The distributor for the 2.5L MFI Turbo I and the 2.5L MFI Flex Fuel engines has two pick-up leads, whereas the other distributor has only one



NOTE: This system does not include the 2.5L Premier engine — the ignition system found on the 2.5L Premier engine will be referred to as the Eagle Ignition System.

All 1988–95 versions of the 2.2L EFI (non-turbocharged), 2.5L EFI, 2.5L MFI Flex Fuel and 2.5L MFI Turbo I engines utilize the Chrysler ignition system. The 2.2L MFI Turbo III engine utilizes a distributorless ignition system, which will be covered later in this section. The Chrysler ignition system is regulated by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM), which is also known as the Single Board Engine Controller (SBEC) or the Single Module Engine Controller (SMEC), depending on the year of manufacture of the vehicle. The PCM, SBEC and SMEC function in the exact same manner and will be known from here on as simply the PCM. The PCM supplies battery voltage to the ignition coil through the Auto Shutdown (ASD) relay. The PCM also controls the ground circuit for the ignition coil. By switching the ground path for the coil ON and OFF, the PCM adjusts the ignition timing to meet changing engine operating conditions.

During the crank-start period, the PCM advances ignition timing a predetermined amount. During engine operation, the amount of spark advance provided by the PCM is determined by these input factors:

Coolant temperature
Engine RPM
Available manifold vacuum
The PCM also regulates the fuel injection system. Refer to Section 4 for electronic engine controls and components.

A shutter, sometimes referred to as an interrupter, is attached to the distributor shaft. The shutter contains four blades, one per engine cylinder. A switch plate is mounted to the distributor housing above the shutter. The switch plate contains the distributor pick-up (Hall effect device and magnet) through which the shutter blades rotate. As the shutter blades pass through the pick-up, they interrupt the magnetic field. The Hall effect device in the pick-up senses the change in the magnetic field and switches ON and OFF (which creates pulses), generating the input signal to the PCM. The PCM calculates engine speed through the number of pulses generated.

On 2.5L MFI (flexible fuel vehicles) engines, one of the shutter blades has a window cut into it. The PCM determines injector synchronization from this window. Also, the PCM uses the input for detonation control.

Auto Shutdown (ASD) Relay
Fig. 3: ASD relay location for the 1992–93 Daytona and LeBaron coupe/convertible models shown. On 1991 the Daytona and LeBaron the ASD relay is located in place of the A/C clutch relay



Fig. 4: ASD relay location for the Dynasty models



Fig. 5: ASD relay location for the 1991–95 Spirit, Acclaim, Shadow and Sundance models shown, 1988–90 models (except Dynasty) similar



The PCM operates the Auto Shutdown (ASD) relay and fuel pump relay through one ground path. The PCM operates the relays by switching the ground path on and off. Both relays turn on and off at the same time.

The ASD relay connects the battery voltage to the fuel injector and ignition coil. The fuel pump relay connects the battery voltage to the fuel pump and oxygen sensor heating element.

The PCM turns the ground path off when the ignition switch is in the OFF position. Both relays are off. When the ignition switch is in the ON or crank position, the PCM monitors the distributor pick-up signal. From the pick-up signal, the PCM determines engine speed and ignition timing (coil dwell). If the PCM does not receive a distributor signal when the ignition switch is in the RUN position, it will de-energize both relays. When the relays are de-energized, battery voltage is not supplied to the fuel injector, ignition coil, fuel pump and oxygen sensor heating element.

On Dynasty, Daytona and LeBaron coupe or convertible models, the ASD relay and fuel pump relay are located in the Power Distribution Center. On LeBaron sedan, Spirit, Acclaim, Shadow and Sundance models, the ASD relay and fuel pump relay are mounted on the driver's side fender well, next to the strut tower.

Ignition Coil
Fig. 6: The ignition coil for 1988–90 models (and early 1991 Sundance and Shadow convertibles) is mounted on the right-hand inner fender, near the A/C compressor



Fig. 7: The ignition coil for all other 1991–95 models is mounted to the left-hand side of the engine block, near the oil dipstick



The 2.2L EFI, 2.5L EFI, 2.5L MFI Turbo I and 2.5L MFI Flex Fuel engines use an epoxy type coil, which is not oil filled. The windings are embedded in a heat and vibration resistant epoxy compound.

The PCM operates the ignition coil through the ASD relay. When the relay is energized by the PCM, battery voltage is connected to the ignition coil positive terminal. The PCM will de-energize the ASD relay if it does not receive an input from the distributor pick-up. The coil is mounted on the rear of the intake manifold next to the air cleaner.







1988–96 ELECTRONIC DISTRIBUTOR IGNITION SYSTEMS
General Information
CHRYSLER IGNITION SYSTEM
The engine speed input is supplied to the PCM by the distributor pick-up. The distributor pick-up is a Hall effect device.

Fig. 1: The internal shutter (interrupter) mechanism of the 2.2L EFI and 2.5L EFI engines



Fig. 2: The distributor for the 2.5L MFI Turbo I and the 2.5L MFI Flex Fuel engines has two pick-up leads, whereas the other distributor has only one



NOTE: This system does not include the 2.5L Premier engine — the ignition system found on the 2.5L Premier engine will be referred to as the Eagle Ignition System.

All 1988–95 versions of the 2.2L EFI (non-turbocharged), 2.5L EFI, 2.5L MFI Flex Fuel and 2.5L MFI Turbo I engines utilize the Chrysler ignition system. The 2.2L MFI Turbo III engine utilizes a distributorless ignition system, which will be covered later in this section. The Chrysler ignition system is regulated by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM), which is also known as the Single Board Engine Controller (SBEC) or the Single Module Engine Controller (SMEC), depending on the year of manufacture of the vehicle. The PCM, SBEC and SMEC function in the exact same manner and will be known from here on as simply the PCM. The PCM supplies battery voltage to the ignition coil through the Auto Shutdown (ASD) relay. The PCM also controls the ground circuit for the ignition coil. By switching the ground path for the coil ON and OFF, the PCM adjusts the ignition timing to meet changing engine operating conditions.

During the crank-start period, the PCM advances ignition timing a predetermined amount. During engine operation, the amount of spark advance provided by the PCM is determined by these input factors:

Coolant temperature
Engine RPM
Available manifold vacuum
The PCM also regulates the fuel injection system. Refer to Section 4 for electronic engine controls and components.

A shutter, sometimes referred to as an interrupter, is attached to the distributor shaft. The shutter contains four blades, one per engine cylinder. A switch plate is mounted to the distributor housing above the shutter. The switch plate contains the distributor pick-up (Hall effect device and magnet) through which the shutter blades rotate. As the shutter blades pass through the pick-up, they interrupt the magnetic field. The Hall effect device in the pick-up senses the change in the magnetic field and switches ON and OFF (which creates pulses), generating the input signal to the PCM. The PCM calculates engine speed through the number of pulses generated.

On 2.5L MFI (flexible fuel vehicles) engines, one of the shutter blades has a window cut into it. The PCM determines injector synchronization from this window. Also, the PCM uses the input for detonation control.

Auto Shutdown (ASD) Relay
Fig. 3: ASD relay location for the 1992–93 Daytona and LeBaron coupe/convertible models shown. On 1991 the Daytona and LeBaron the ASD relay is located in place of the A/C clutch relay



Fig. 4: ASD relay location for the Dynasty models



Fig. 5: ASD relay location for the 1991–95 Spirit, Acclaim, Shadow and Sundance models shown, 1988–90 models (except Dynasty) similar



The PCM operates the Auto Shutdown (ASD) relay and fuel pump relay through one ground path. The PCM operates the relays by switching the ground path on and off. Both relays turn on and off at the same time.

The ASD relay connects the battery voltage to the fuel injector and ignition coil. The fuel pump relay connects the battery voltage to the fuel pump and oxygen sensor heating element.

The PCM turns the ground path off when the ignition switch is in the OFF position. Both relays are off. When the ignition switch is in the ON or crank position, the PCM monitors the distributor pick-up signal. From the pick-up signal, the PCM determines engine speed and ignition timing (coil dwell). If the PCM does not receive a distributor signal when the ignition switch is in the RUN position, it will de-energize both relays. When the relays are de-energized, battery voltage is not supplied to the fuel injector, ignition coil, fuel pump and oxygen sensor heating element.

On Dynasty, Daytona and LeBaron coupe or convertible models, the ASD relay and fuel pump relay are located in the Power Distribution Center. On LeBaron sedan, Spirit, Acclaim, Shadow and Sundance models, the ASD relay and fuel pump relay are mounted on the driver's side fender well, next to the strut tower.

Ignition Coil
Fig. 6: The ignition coil for 1988–90 models (and early 1991 Sundance and Shadow convertibles) is mounted on the right-hand inner fender, near the A/C compressor



Fig. 7: The ignition coil for all other 1991–95 models is mounted to the left-hand side of the engine block, near the oil dipstick



The 2.2L EFI, 2.5L EFI, 2.5L MFI Turbo I and 2.5L MFI Flex Fuel engines use an epoxy type coil, which is not oil filled. The windings are embedded in a heat and vibration resistant epoxy compound.

The PCM operates the ignition coil through the ASD relay. When the relay is energized by the PCM, battery voltage is connected to the ignition coil positive terminal. The PCM will de-energize the ASD relay if it does not receive an input from the distributor pick-up. The coil is mounted on the rear of the intake manifold next to the air cleaner.



Edited by Dale Stockstill on 2/14/2010 at 1:15 AM EST
Dale Stockstill and other Car Specialists are ready to help you

Did you get the previous information Josh ??

Dale

Customer: replied 7 years ago.

Dale, thank you very much. i did get the car back home to my heated garage. i also found a relay melted under my dash. the relay is part of an aftermarket remote start system. im going to replace the relay tonight. you have been very helpfull. again thankyou :-)

You are quite Welcome Josh. Let me know if I can help you in any other way in the future.

 

http://www.justanswer.com/profile.aspx?PF=19741685&FID=0

 

Sincerely,

Dale

Hello Josh,

 

Did you get her running?

 

Just checking u on the situation?

 

Sincerely,

Dale

Customer: replied 7 years ago.
sure did, found the power wire corroded off the connector on the auto shut down relay.
Customer: replied 7 years ago.
sure did, found the power wire corroded off the connector on the auto shut down relay. thank you again.

Wonderful !

I am so glad we could help you in a small way.

Have a Blessed Day!

Sincerely

Dale

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