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Dan
Dan, Auto Service Technician
Category: Car
Satisfied Customers: 3490
Experience:  GM ASEP A.A.S. 14 years GM experience. Mark of Excellence and Professional Guild awarded.
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what is the maximum egt for a duramax diesel 6.6

Customer Question

No Comment Added
Submitted: 6 years ago.
Category: Car
Expert:  Dan replied 6 years ago.
Are you asking what is the max exhaust gas temp a Duramax can have? How hot does the exhaust get?
Customer: replied 6 years ago.
Reply to Dan's Post: what is the max exhaust temp i should run
Expert:  Dan replied 6 years ago.
Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) System Description

Exhaust Particulate Filter


Object Number:(NNN) NNN-NNNN Size: SH
Click here for detailed picture of above imageidth=

The exhaust particulate filter (EPF) captures diesel exhaust gas particulates, preventing their release into the atmosphere. This is accomplished by forcing particulate-laden exhaust (1) through a filter substrate of porous cells, which removes the particulates from the exhaust gas. The exhaust gas enters the filter, but because every other cell of the filter is capped at the opposite end, the exhaust particulates cannot exit the cell. Instead, the exhaust gas passes through the porous walls of the cell leaving the particulates trapped on the cell wall. The cleaned exhaust gas exits the filter through the adjacent cell. The EPF is capable of reducing more than 90 percent of particulate matter (PM).

Diesel Particulate Filter Layout


Object Number:(NNN) NNN-NNNN Size: MF
Click here for detailed picture of above imageidth=
(1)Exhaust Gas Temperature (EGT) Sensor 1
(2)Differential Pressure Sensor (DPS) Pressure Lines
(3)Differential Pressure Sensor (DPS)
(4)Exhaust Cooler
(5)Exhaust Gas Temperature (EGT) Sensor 2
(6)Exhaust Particulate Filter (EPF)
(7)Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC)

Diesel Oxidation Catalyst

The diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) (7) has two functions. One function is to reduce emissions of non methane hydro-carbons (NMHC) and carbon monoxide (CO), from the exhaust gases. The other function is to help start a regeneration event by converting the fuel-rich exhaust gases to heat. The engine control module (ECM) monitors the functionally of the DOC by determining if the exhaust gas temperature (EGT) sensor 1 (1) reaches a predetermined temperature during a regeneration event. The DOC and the exhaust particulate filter (EPF) (6) are downstream of the turbocharger, and are two separate components under the vehicle.

Differential Pressure Sensor (DPS) and Pressure Lines

The differential pressure sensor (DPS) (3) measures the pressure difference between the inlet and outlet of the exhaust particulate filter (EPF). When pressure difference has increased above a calibrated threshold, a high particulate loading condition is indicated. The ECM will command a regeneration event in order to restore the filter. If the pressure differential continues to increase across the exhaust filter without a regeneration event, the ECM will illuminate an EPF lamp or send a message to the driver information center (DIC) referring the customer to clean the exhaust filter. To clean the exhaust filter the vehicle must be driven under the conditions necessary for a regeneration to take place. If these lamps and messages are ignored, the ECM will eventually illuminate the malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) and revert to Reduced Engine Power which will require the vehicle to be serviced.

The DPS sensor provides a voltage signal to the ECM on a signal circuit relative to the pressure differential changes in the EPF. The ECM converts the signal voltage input to a pressure value.

The DPS pressure lines (2) are connected before and after the EPF. To provide the pressure sensor with accurate back pressure measurements, the DPS pressure lines should have a continuous downward gradient, without any sharp bends or kinks.

Exhaust Gas Temperature Sensors

The ECM uses two exhaust gas temperature (EGT) sensors to measure the temperature of the exhaust gases at the inlet and outlet of the exhaust particulate filter (EPF). The EGT sensors are variable resistors, when the EGT sensors are cold, the sensor resistance is low, and as the temperature increases, the sensor resistance increases. When sensor resistance is high, the ECM detects a high voltage on the signal circuit. When sensor resistance is low, the ECM detects a lower voltage on the signal circuit. Proper EGTs at the inlet and outlet of the EPF are crucial for proper operation and for initiating the regeneration process. A temperature that is too high in the EPF will cause the EPF substrate to melt or crack. The ECM monitors the temperatures at the EPF inlet and outlet to regulate EPF temperatures.

Intake Air (IA) Valve

The intake air (IA) valve is located upstream of the intake air heater, and is normally in the open position. The ECM commands the valve to close in order to precisely control combustion temperature control during exhaust particulate filter (EPF) regeneration. The IA valve will ensure the temperature of the exhaust gas remains in an efficient range under all operating conditions. The IA valve system uses a position sensor located within the valve assembly to monitor the position of the valve. The IA valve uses a motor to move the valve to a closed position and spring tension returns it to the open position. The motor is operated through Motor Control 1 and 2 circuits.

Exhaust Cooler

The exhaust system has been designed to reduce exhaust gas temperatures during regeneration. The exhaust cooler (4) at the end of the tailpipe draws in cooler air as exhaust gases flow through its openings. The cooler air mixes with the warmer exhaust gas, reducing exhaust gas temperatures at the tailpipe outlet.

Normal Regeneration

Regeneration is the process of removing the captured particulates through incineration within the exhaust particulate filer (EPF). Elevated temperatures are created in the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) through a calibrated strategy in the engine control system.

Regeneration occurs when the ECM calculates that the particulate level in the filter has reached a calibrated threshold using a number of different factors, including engine run time, distance traveled, fuel used since the last regeneration, and the exhaust differential pressure. In general, the vehicle will need to be operating continuously at speeds above 48 km/h (30 mph) for approximately 20-30 minutes for a full and effective regeneration to complete. During regeneration the exhaust gases reach temperatures above 550°C (1,022°F). The ECM monitors the EGT sensors during regeneration. If the sensors indicate that regeneration temperatures are exceeding a calibrated threshold, regeneration will be temporally suspended until the sensors return to a normal temperature. If EGT temperatures fall below a normal calibrated threshold, regeneration will be terminated and a corresponding DTC should set. If a regeneration event is interrupted for any reason, it will continue, including the next key cycle, when the conditions are met for regeneration enablement. Normal regeneration is transparent to the customer.

Service Regeneration

Caution: Tailpipe outlet exhaust temperature will be greater than 300°C (572°F) during service regeneration. To help prevent personal injury or property damage from fire or burns, perform the following:

  1. Do not connect any shop exhaust removal hoses to the vehicle's tailpipe.
  2. Park the vehicle outdoors and keep people, other vehicles, and combustible material away during service regeneration.
  3. Do not leave the vehicle unattended.

 

Caution: To avoid extremely elevated exhaust temperatures, inspect and remove any debris or mud build up at the exhaust cooler located at the tailpipe.

Notice: Due to the elevated engine temperatures created while performing this procedure it is imperative to keep the front of vehicle in an open environment, with the hood open, away from any walls or buildings. This will ensure proper airflow across the radiator.

A scan tool is an essential tool that is required for service regeneration. Commanding a service regeneration is accomplished using the output control function. The vehicle will need to be parked outside the facility and away from nearby objects, such as other vehicles and buildings, due to the elevated exhaust gas temperature at the tail pipe during regeneration. The service regeneration can be terminated by applying the brake pedal, commanding service regeneration OFF using the scan tool, or disconnecting the scan tool from the vehicle.

Regeneration Process

A number of engine components are required to function together for the regeneration process to be performed. These components are the fuel injectors, turbocharger, IA valve, fuel pressure control, and the intake air heater (IAH).

The regeneration process consists of several stages:

Warming up the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) to 350°C (662°F) by performing the following:

Reducing air flow with the intake air valve
Increasing or decreasing boost pressure with the turbocharger, depending on engine load
Elevating the engine speed
Reduce fuel rail pressure
Retard fuel injection timing
Add late fuel injection pulses. The added fuel is not combusted but is oxidized by the DOC and exhaust particulate filter (EPF) to create heat.

Ash Loading

Ash is a non-combustible by product from normal oil consumption. Low Ash content engine oil (CJ-4 API) is required for vehicles with the exhaust particulate filter (EPF) system. Ash accumulation in the EPF will eventually cause a restriction in particulate filter. Regeneration will not burn off the ash, only particulate matter is burned off. An ash loaded EPF will need to be removed from the vehicle and cleaned or replaced.

Customer: replied 6 years ago.
yes all want to know is what is comfortable temp for the exhaust i have put in a evoultion chip
Expert:  Dan replied 6 years ago.

Unfortunately all I can get you for now is this chart which lists Kpa and volts for the exhaust pressure sensors. The computer takes that info and converts into temp readings. Let me do some more digging and see what I can find ok. I am kind of curious myself.

Scan Tool Parameter

Data List

Units Displayed

Typical Data Value

Operating Conditions: Engine Idling/Lower Radiator Hose Hot/Closed Throttle/Park or Neutral/Accessories Off

5-Volt Reference 1 Circuit

Exh.

OK/Fault

OK

5-Volt Reference 2 Circuit

Exh.

OK/Fault

OK

5-Volt Reference 3 Circuit

Exh.

OK/Fault

OK

A/C Relay Command

Eng, EGR

ON/OFF

Off

Ambient Air Temp.

Eng

°C (°F)

Varies

APP Indicated Angle

Eng, EGR, Fuel, FF/FR

%

0.0

APP Sensor 1

Eng Spd

Volts

0.90-0.94

APP Sensor 1 Indicated Position

Eng Spd

%

0%

APP Sensor 2

Eng Spd

Volts

0.40-0.50

App Sensor 2 Indicated Position

Eng Spd

%

0%

Balancing Rate Cyl. 1-8

Eng, Fuel

mm³

-4.0 to +4.0

BARO

Eng, EGR, FF/FR

kPa

65-104 (Varies with altitude)

Base Injector Fuel Rate

Eng Fuel

mm³

5-7

Boost Pressure Sensor

Eng Spd, Ind

kPa

BARO

CAM Signal Present

Eng. Pos.

Yes/No

Yes

CKP Sensor Signal Present

Eng. Pos.

Yes/No

Yes

Cmmd. A/F Equivalence Ratio

Eng, Exh, Fuel, Ind

Ratio

0:2:1

Coolant Level Switch

Eng

OK/Low

OK

Cruise Control Active

Eng.

Yes/No

No

Current Fuel Type

Fuel

Diesel

Diesel

Desired EGR Position

EGR

%

20-50

Desired Fuel Rail Pressure

Eng, Fuel, EGR

MPa/PSI

25-35 MPa (3,626-5,076 psi)

Desired IAF Valve Position

EGR, Exh, Induc.

%

100

Desired Idle Speed

Eng 1, FF/FR

RPM

630-700

Desired TC Boost

Induc., Eng, Spd.

kPa

BARO

Des. TC Vane Position

TC

%

80-100

Des. TC Vane Pos. Ctrl. Solenoid

TC

Amps

0.0

Distance Since DTC Cleared

Eng

km/miles

0

Distance Since Last DPF Regeneration

Exh

km/miles

Varies

DPF Indicator Command

Exh.

ON/OFF

OFF

DPF Pressure Sensor

Exh.

Volts

0.97-1.3

DPF Regen Inhibit Reason

Exh.

Reason

Reason

DPF Regeneration Completed

Exh.

Counts

Varies

DPF Regeneration Reason

Exh.

Reason

Reason

DPF Regeneration Status

Exh.

Statement

Not Required

DPF Soot Mass

Exh.

Grams

0-10

EC Ignition Relay Command

Eng, Eng Spd.

ON/OFF

ON

ECT Sensor 1

All

°C (°F)

105-185°C (221-365°F)

ECT Sensor 2

Eng

°C (°F)

105-185°C (221-365°F)

EGR Learned Minimum Position

EGR

%

0

EGR Position Sensor

EGR

Volts

1-1.1

EGR Position Sensor

Eng

%

20

EGR Position Variance

EGR

%

Varies

EGR Solenoid Command

EGR

%

5-15

EGT Sensor 1

Exh.

°C (°F)

80-120°C (176-248°F)

EGT Sensor 2

Exh.

°C (°F)

80-120°C (176-248°F)

Engine Load

All

%

1%

Engine Oil Life Remaining

Eng 1

%

Varies

Engine Oil Pressure Sensor

Fuel

kPa/PSI

Varies

Engine Run Time

All

Hrs/Mins/Sec

Varies with engine run time

Engine Run Time Since Last DPF Regeneration

Exh.

HH:MM:SS

Varies

Engine Speed

All

RPM

+/-50 RPM from desired

FRP Regulator Command

Eng, Fuel, EGR, FF/FR

%

35-45

Fuel Level Sensor

Fuel

Volts

Varies with fuel level

Fuel Pump Relay Command

Eng, Fuel

ON/OFF

OFF

Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor

Eng, Fuel

MPa

25-35 MPa (3,626-5,076 psi)

Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor

Fuel

Volts

1-2

Fuel Tank Level Remaining

Eng, Exh., Fuel, Mis.

%

Varies

Fuel Temperature Sensor

Eng, Fuel, FF/FR

°C/°F

10-90°C (50-194°F)

Fuel Used Since Last DPF Regeneration

Exh.

Liters/Gallons

3.78/1 (1 regen complete)

Glow Plug Command

Eng, Ind.

ON/OFF

OFF

High Idle Switch

Eng. Spd.

On/Off

Off

IAF Valve Learned Minimum

Ind.

%

100

IAF Valve Position

EGR, Exh., Ind.

%

100

IAF Valve Pos. Sensor

Ind.

Volts

4-5 Volts

IAT Sensor 1

Eng 1, EGR, TC, FF/FR

°C/°F

10-90°C (50-194°F) (temperatures may increase under heavy engine loads)

IAT Sensor 2

Eng 1, EGR, TC, FF/FR

°C/°F

10-90°C (50-194°F) (temperatures may increase under heavy engine loads)

Ignition Accessory Signal

Eng, Eng. Spd.

ON/OFF

OFF

Ignition 1 Signal

Eng 1, EGR, FF/FR

Volts

battery voltage (accuracy +/-0.4 volts)

Ignition 1 Signal

All

Volts

12-14

Injection Pump CAM Reference Signal Missed

Eng. Pos., Fuel

Counts

0

Injector Timing

Eng, Fuel

°

--

Intake Air Heater Command

Exh., Ind.

%

0

Intake Air Heater Command

Ind.

ON/OFF

OFF

MAF Sensor

Ind.

Hz

2400-1700

MAP Sensor

Eng, Ind

Grams

Varies

Misfire Current Cyl. 1

Mis.

Counts

0

Misfire Current Cyl. 2

Mis.

Counts

0

Misfire Current Cyl. 3

Mis.

Counts

0

Misfire Current Cyl. 4

Mis.

Counts

0

Misfire Current Cyl. 5

Mis.

Counts

0

Misfire Current Cyl. 6

Mis.

Counts

0

Misfire Current Cyl. 7

Mis.

Counts

0

Misfire Current Cyl. 8

Mis.

Counts

0

Particulate Filt. Pressure Variance

Eng. Spd., Exh., Ind.

kPa

0.0-3.5

Pilot Inj. Cyl. 1-8 Command

Eng

On/Off

On

PNP Switch

Eng

In Gear/Park/Neutral

Park/Neutral

Reduced Engine Power

Cyl. Dea., Eng. Spd., Fuel

Inactive, Active

Inactive

Start up ECT

Cool

°C/°F

Varies (ECT at time of engine startup)

Start Up Fuel Temperature

Fuel

°C/°F

Varies

Start up IAT

Cool

°C/°F

Varies (IAT at time of engine startup)

TC Vane Position Lrn. this run cycle

Ind

Yes/No

Yes

TC Vane Position Lrn. Since DTC Clear

Ind

Yes/No

Yes

TC Vane Position Sensor

Ind

%

70-100

TC Vane Position Sensor

Ind.

Volts

2-4

TC Vane Pos. Ctrl. Solenoid

Ind

DC

40-50

TCC/Cruise Brake Pedal Switch

Eng

Applied/Released

Released

Vehicle Speed Sensor

All

mph/km/h

0

Warm-ups Since DTC Cleared

Eng

Counts

1

Warm-ups w/o Emission Faults

Eng

Counts

0

Warm-ups w/o Non-Emission Faults

Eng

Counts

0

Water In Fuel Sensor

Fuel

Water/ No Water

No Water

Water In Fuel Sensor

Fuel

Volts

0.21-4.75

Customer: replied 6 years ago.
this is not helping like i said i put in evolution chip what is a normal temperature for the egt reading
Customer: replied 6 years ago.
no i dont have a answer yet

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