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TrevHelpsYou
TrevHelpsYou, Mechanic
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Experience:  10 Years Salvage
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Turbo ecu, ecu+, gm3 MAS, 450 injectors and resistor pack..solenoid

Resolved Question:

i did a conversion from a non turbo to turbo 92 talon i have put everything, turbo ecu, ecu+, gm3" MAS, 450 injectors and resistor pack, the car start but doesnt past 3000rpm, is there something im missing? i have done everything step by step, please help me i want my car up and running ill pay any decent price if you can fix my problem. by the way it doesnt have a wastegate solenoid i been told i dont need it, i dont know if that could be my problem. PLEASE HELP.
Submitted: 6 years ago.
Category: Car
Expert:  TrevHelpsYou replied 6 years ago.
Hi,

I have a couple ideas for your problem. First I would like you to check the fault codes and see what they say for the vehicle. I have instructions below.

Eagle Trouble Code Info

Retrieving codes

  • Locate the diagnostic connector in or under the glove compartment. (Summit models in fuse box)
  • Connect analog voltmeter to upper LH (+) and lower RH (-) terminals
  • Most Summit models, connect voltmeter (+) to upper LH of the 12 pin connector and (-) to the 2 middle
  • SOME Station wagon models you may have to ground the upper LH of the 16 pin connector
  • Turn the ignition on, then watch the sweeps of the vlotmeter
  • Long sweeps are tens and shirt sweeps are ones.
  • Continuous short sweeps indicated no codes.

Clearing Codes

Disconnect the battery from the Negative terminal to clear codes.

Also I have not checked but feel you might have a problem wiht the compression of the vehicle. See many turbo motors are designed with lower physical compression ratios. then when they get higher RPMs the turbos have room to stuff more air in. SO if you take a regular motor with high compression ratios. Then add turbo the trubo forces to much air fuel mixturin and it will act liek engine brake instead of turbo. And cause lots of detination and pinging when the speeds are higher. this will cause the computer to retard the timeing and other things to adjust for the detination.

Hope this helps if so click accept. If not please let me know and I will try to help.


Customer: replied 6 years ago.
i dont think theres a problem with the compression or retarding the timing cause i got the stock turbo ecu, plus i got a piggy back and on the other hand this cars are very easy to convert to turbo. can it be a leaking on he intercoller pipping causing all this problem? i just got done doing a on board diagnostic with my ecu+ and this is what i found CODE 12 intake air flow sensor
Expert:  TrevHelpsYou replied 6 years ago.
Maf testing

See Figures 1 and 2

The intake air temperature sensor (provided on the air flow sensor on all engines, except the 1995-98 2.0L non-turbo) is a resistor which measures the intake air temperature. The ECU will determine the intake air temperature according to the output voltage from the sensor, and compensates the fuel injection amount according to the intake air temperature.

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 1: Location of the intake air temperature sensor (integral with the volume air flow sensor)-1990-94 vehicles


Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 2: On 1995-98 2.0L non-turbo engines, the IAT sensor is mounted on the intake plenum


When the intake air temperature sensor is faulty, it controls the fuel injection amount based on an intake air temperature default of 77°F (25°C). The driveability of the vehicle may become poor during cold temperature operation. The trouble may not be noticeable when the ambient temperature is around 77°F (25°C).


TESTING


Except 1995-98 2.0L Non-Turbo Engine

See Figures 3, 4 and 5

  1. Detach the air flow sensor electrical connector.

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 3: IAT sensor terminal identification-1990-94 vehicles


Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 4: IAT sensor terminal identification-1995-98 2.0L turbo and 2.4L engines


Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 5: Measure the intake air temperature sensor resistance while heating it with a hair drier


  1. If equipped with non-turbo engines, measure the resistance between terminals No. 4 and No. 6 of the electrical connector.

  2. If equipped with turbo engine, measure the resistance between terminals No. 6 and No. 8 of the sensor electric connector.

  3. Compare test readings to specifications:

    1. Sensor temperature of 32°F (0°C)-5.3-6.7 kilo-ohms

    2. Sensor temperature of 68°F (20°C)-2.3-3.0 kilo-ohms

    3. Sensor temperature of 176°F (80°C)-0.30-0.42 kilo-ohms

  4. Measure the sensor resistance while heating the sensor area with a hair dryer. As the temperature of the sensor increases, sensor resistance should become smaller.

  5. If the measured resistance deviates from the standard value or the resistance remains unchanged, replace the air flow sensor assembly.


1995-98 2.0L Non-Turbo Engine

See Figure 6

  1. Detach the IAT sensor connector.

  2. If necessary, you can remove the sensor to test it.

  3. Use a DVOM to measure the resistance between the sensor terminals and compare with the following specifications:

    1. At 77°F (25°C), the resistance should be 9-11 kilo-ohms.

    2. At 212°F (100°C), the resistance should be 0.6-0.8 ohms.

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 6: Use an ohmmeter (1) to measure the resistance of the IAT sensor (2). Note that this sensor is within specifications


  1. If the resistance is not within the specified range, replace the sensor.

  2. If removed, install the sensor. Attach the connector.


REMOVAL & INSTALLATION


Except 1995-98 2.0L Non-Turbo Engines

See Figure 1

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.

  2. Unplug the sensor electrical connector from the sensor.

  3. If necessary, carefully remove the lid of the air filter housing.

  4. Unfasten the retainers, then remove the sensor from the air cleaner housing.

  5. Installation is the reverse of the removal procedure.


1995-98 2.0L Non-Turbo Engines

See Figures 7, 8 and 9

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.

  2. Detach the IAT sensor harness connector.

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 7: Unplug the IAT sensor electrical connector


  1. Unthread the IAT sensor and remove from the intake plenum.

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 8: Use a open-end wrench to loosen ...


Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 9: ...then remove the IAT sensor from the vehicle


To install:

  1. Apply Loctite® 24200 or equivalent sealant to the threads of the sensor and install in the intake plenum. Tighten the sensor to 5 ft. lbs. (7 Nm.

  2. Attach the sensor electrical connector. Make sure it is connected securely.

  3. Connect the negative battery cable.

Customer: replied 6 years ago.
Reply to TrevHelpsYou's Post: i did my last test and this is the results, the gm3 MAS can be located as a blow tru mode or stock mode before the turbo, i took the MAS and installed on blow tru mode and took off the intercooler pipe coming from the turbo and just let the sensor open in the front and the car rev just fine, i put it back in and still wont rev so now i know the MAS is working and all the connection are good, for some reason the computer or the MAS is not reading positive air pressure. can it be a sensor in the intake manifold causing this problem?
Expert:  TrevHelpsYou replied 6 years ago.
Ok I am will admit I am not sure on some of this only some guesses on things involved with the switch between the two. I have been looking over some of the things that are different and one that is different that might have some effect on performance and limit it.
Purge Control System
  • 1990-94 2.0L non-turbo engine-on the firewall, slightly right of center.

  • 1990-94 2.0L turbo engine-the innermost solenoid in the solenoid cluster at the left rear corner of the engine compartment.


1990-94 NON-TURBO ENGINES

  1. Disconnect the red striped vacuum hose from the throttle body and connect it to a hand held vacuum pump.

  2. Plug the open nipple on the throttle body.

  3. Using the hand pump, apply vacuum while the engine is idling. Check that vacuum is maintained or released as outlined below:

    1. With the engine coolant at 140°F (60°C) or less-14.8 in. Hg of vacuum is maintained.

    2. With the coolant at 158°F (70°C) or higher-14.8 in. Hg of vacuum is maintained.

  4. With the engine coolant at 158°F (70°C) or higher, run the engine at 3000 rpm within 3 minutes of starting vehicle. Try to apply vacuum using the hand held pump. Vacuum should leak.

  5. With the engine coolant at 158°F (70°C) or higher, run the engine at 3000 rpm after 3 minutes have elapsed after starting vehicle. Apply 14.8 in. Hg of vacuum. The vacuum should be maintained momentarily, after which it should leak.

The vacuum will leak continuously if the altitude is 7,200 ft. or higher, or the intake air temperature is 122°F (50°C) or higher.

  1. If the test results differ from the desired results, the purge control system is not operating properly.

1990-92 TURBO ENGINES

  1. Disconnect the purge air hose from the intake hose and plug the air intake hose.

  2. Connect a hand vacuum pump to the purge air hose.

  3. Under various engine conditions, inspect the system operation:

    1. Allow the engine to cool to a temperature of 140°F (60°C) or below.

    2. Start the engine and run at idle.

    3. Using the hand pump, apply 14.8 in. Hg of vacuum. In this condition, the vacuum should be maintained.

    4. Raise the engine speed to 3000 rpm.

    5. Using the hand pump, apply 14.8 in. Hg of vacuum. In this condition, the vacuum should be maintained.

  4. Run the engine until the coolant temperature reaches 158°F (70°C). Inspect system operations as follows:

    1. Using the hand pump, apply 14.8 in. Hg of vacuum with the engine at idle. In this condition, vacuum should be maintained.

    2. Increase the engine speed to 3000 rpm within 3 minutes of starting the engine. Try applying vacuum. The vacuum should leak.

    3. After 3 minutes have elapsed after starting engine, raise the engine speed to 3000 rpm. Apply 14.8 in. Hg of vacuum. Vacuum should be maintained momentarily, after which it will leak.

The vacuum will leak continuously if the altitude is 7200 ft. or higher or the air temperature is 122°F (50°C) or higher.

  1. If the results of either test differs from specifications, the system is not functioning properly and will require further diagnosis.

Expert:  TrevHelpsYou replied 6 years ago.
How are you coming with this project? Did you try a compression test and what did you get for a test of the MAS? You may have to run the wires physically to make sure htey are good.
TrevHelpsYou, Mechanic
Category: Car
Satisfied Customers: 74
Experience: 10 Years Salvage
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