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Amedee, Former ASE Master Tech
Category: Car
Satisfied Customers: 24093
Experience:  ASE certified tech advanced level specialist. Wisconsin certified emissions state inspector
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1998 GMC: Ruff..Idle It Has Spark And Acts..Throttle Position Sensor

Resolved Question:

My 1998 GMC Sierra Won''t Start Runs Very Ruff @ Idle It Has Spark And Acts Like It Wants To Start Just Replaced The Throttle Position Sensor
Submitted: 8 years ago.
Category: Car
Expert:  Amedee replied 8 years ago.

You could have a bad fuel pump. I would rec to check fuel pressure. Fuel injected cars are very fuel pressure sensitive. Fuel pressure is very important and must be within specifications! But if the pressure is low, it does not mean the pump is bad. A plugged fuel filter, a pinched line, and low voltage at the pump can contribute to low fuel pressure. All three must be check before replacing the pump! You can get a fuel pressure gage at a local auto parts store for cheap. Good luck!
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Customer: replied 8 years ago.
Reply to AMEDEE's Post: Fuel Pump Was Replaced About a year ago Could it be anything else
Expert:  Amedee replied 8 years ago.
You might have an air or a vacuum leak. This is very common! Open the hood and listen for a hissing sound when the engine is running.
Unmetered air can enter the engine through a vacuum leak, a dirty airflow sensor that is not reading airflow accurately, an EGR valve is not closing and is leaking exhaust into the intake manifold, an EGR valve that is allowing too much flow.
If it is hard to pinpoint take some brake cleaner or starting fluid around the intake manifold and vacuum lines and see if the engine stumbles or if the idle is affected. Be extremely careful when doing this!

Or, you could have a bad mass air flow sensor. Or the snorkel from the mass air flow sensor to the throttle body could be ripped. Both are very common and can cause you vehicle to loose power along with many other drive ability issues. First look for cracks or rips or anywhere air can enter the engine that is not accounted for by the mass air flow sensor. Next comes the Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensor. This is a very important sensor input to the computer. It uses a hot wire sensing element to measure the amount of air entering the engine. The MAF sensor then outputs an analog voltage signal to the PCM proportional to the intake air mass. The PCM calculates the required fuel injector pulse width in order to provide the desired air/fuel ratio. If the sensor is bad than this air/fuel ratio will be off causing severe performance issues. In extreme cases, I have seen these two problems cause a no start condition. This input can also be used in determining transmission Electronic Pressure Control, shift and torque converter clutch scheduling. The check engine light may even pop on if the sensor is bad, the snorkel is ripped or a tube has fallen off. This will result in a lean condition. Whether it be the sensor or the snorkel, you can even do it yourself!

Check for the following conditions:

Poor connection at PCM or IAC motor. Inspect harness connectors for backed out terminals, improper mating, broken locks, improperly formed or damaged terminals, and poor terminal to wire connection.
Damaged harness. Inspect the wiring harness for damage.
Restricted air intake system. Check for a possible collapsed air intake duct, restricted air filter element, or foreign objects blocking the air intake system.
Throttle body. Check for objects blocking the IAC passage or throttle bore, excessive deposits in the IAC passage and on the IAC pintle, and excessive deposits in the throttle bore and on the throttle plate. Check for a sticking throttle plate. Also inspect the IAC passage for deposits or objects which will not allow the IAC pintle to fully extend.
Vacuum leak. Check for a condition that causes a vacuum leak, such as disconnected or damaged hoses, leaks at EGR valve and EGR pipe to intake manifold, leaks at throttle body, faulty or incorrectly installed PCV valve, leaks at intake manifold brake booster hose disconnected, oil filler cap, oil level indicator loose or missing, etc..