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Bob
Bob, Auto Service Technician
Category: Car
Satisfied Customers: 4087
Experience:  40 year GM Tech. +30 Certified. ASE Master Tech.(expired, retired) Medium Duty, Heavy Line, Retired
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instructions installing 1996 saturn sl2 clutch

Customer Question

my clutch is sliping and do i need to change it?
Submitted: 7 years ago.
Category: Car
Expert:  Bob replied 7 years ago.

The first part of the instructions will deal with removal and installation of the transmission. You may be able to rent the engine support fixture from a local parts store. The second part will deal with the clutch.

Figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7

  1. Properly disable the SIR system, if equipped, and disconnect the negative, then positive battery cables.

  2. Remove the air inlet duct fasteners, detach the air temperature sensor connector and remove the air cleaner/inlet duct assembly.

  3. Unfasten the battery hold-down, then remove the battery from the vehicle. Place the battery in a safe location, but do not store on a concrete surface or discharge will result. Next, unfasten and remove the battery tray. Note that one battery tray bolt is located in the fender well area.

  4. For 1992-98 vehicles, remove the transaxle strut-to-cradle bracket through-bolt located on the radiator side of the transaxle. Flip the transaxle strut out of the way.

  5. Disengage the back-up light switch and vehicle speed sensor electrical connectors from the transaxle. Remove the vent tube retaining clip and discard if damaged.

  6. Remove the 2 ground terminals from the top 2 clutch housing studs.

  7. On 1991 vehicles, unclip the oxygen sensor wire from the clutch housing.

  8. On 1991 DOHC engines, remove the nut from the cradle-to-front engine cable bracket at the front right corner of the cradle, below the water pump.

  9. Remove the top 2 clutch housing studs.

  10. Remove the electronic ignition coil module. Discard the old coil retaining bolts and replace with new bolts upon installation.

  11. For 1991 vehicles, loosen the 2 front transaxle mount-to-transaxle bolts.

  12. Remove the shifter cables from the shift arms and clutch housing, taking care not to damage the cable bolt.

  13. Rotate the clutch slave cylinder 1/4 turn counterclockwise while pushing into the clutch housing, then remove the cylinder from the housing. Remove the 2 clutch hydraulic damper-to-clutch housing bolts, then wire the hydraulic assembly to the upper radiator hose.

  14. Wire the radiator to the upper radiator support to hold the assembly in place when the cradle is removed.

  15. Install engine support bar assembly tool SA9105E or an equivalent. Make sure the support feet are positioned on the outer edge of the shock tower, the bar hooks are connected to the engine bracket and the stabilizer foot is on the engine block, to the right of the engine oil dipstick.

  16. Raise the front of the vehicle sufficiently to lower the transaxle and engine cradle. Support the vehicle safely using jackstands. Make sure the jackstands are not positioned under the engine cradle. Remove the drain plug from the lower center of the housing and drain the transaxle fluid into a clean container.

  17. Remove the front wheels and the left, right and center splash shields from the vehicle. For coupes, remove the left and right lower facia braces.

  18. For 1992-98 vehicles, remove the front engine strut cradle bracket-to-cradle nuts from below the cradle.

  19. Remove the transaxle mount-to-cradle nut from under the cradle.

  20. Remove the front exhaust pipe nuts at the manifold, then disconnect the pipe from the support bracket.

  21. Remove the front pipe-to-catalytic converter bolts and lower the pipe from the vehicle.

  22. Remove the engine-to-transaxle stiffening bracket bolts and remove the bracket. For 1991 vehicles, remove the rear transaxle mount bracket-to-transaxle bolt, then loosen the mount bolt and allow the bracket to hang out of the way.

  23. Remove the clutch housing dust cover. Remove the steering rack-to-cradle bolts and wire the gear for support when cradle is removed. Remove the brake line and retainer from the cradle.

  24. Remove and discard the cotter pin from the lower ball joints. Back off the ball joint nut until the top of the nut is even with the top of the threads.

  25. Use ball joint separator tool SA9132S or equivalent to separate the ball joint from the lower control arm, then remove the nut. Do not use a wedge tool or seal damage may occur.

 

  1. For 1991 vehicles, remove the front transaxle mount-to-cradle nuts and the engine lower mount-to-cradle nuts. These nuts are all located under the front or side cradle members.

  2. Position two 4 in. x 4 in. x 36 in. pieces of wood onto a powertrain support dolly, then position the dolly under the vehicle and against the cradle.

  3. Remove the 4 cradle-to-body bolts and carefully lower the cradle from the vehicle with the support dolly. Tape or wire the 2 large washers from the rear cradle-to-body attachments in position to prevent loss.

  4. Support the transaxle securely with a suitable jack.

  5. Use an appropriate prybar to separate the left side halfshaft from the transaxle. Remove the halfshaft sufficiently to install seal protector tool SA91112T or equivalent around the shaft and into the seal to prevent cuts by the shaft spline.

  6. Remove the 2 bottom clutch housing-to-engine bolts and install a guide bolt into the bottom rear clutch housing bolt hole from the side of the engine block.

  7. Carefully separate the transaxle from the engine enough to clear the intermediate shaft (on the right side) and lower the transaxle from the vehicle.

To install:

  1. Installation of the manual transaxle assembly is the reverse of removal. However, please note the following important steps:

  2. Use a 6 x 1.0mm tap to clean the sealant from the ignition coil module mounting holes.

  3. Place the transaxle assembly securely onto the jack and position under the vehicle for installation. Install axle seal protectors into the seals on both sides.

  4. Tighten the 2 lower clutch housing-to-engine bolts to 103 ft. lbs. (140 Nm). Do not use the bolts to draw the transaxle to the engine.

  5. Be sure to remove the seal protectors before installing the halfshaft. Push the halfshaft all the way into the transaxle and install the snapring. Remove the transaxle jack.

  6. Clean and lubricate the ball joint threads before installing the ball joints into the knuckles.

  7. Verify the correct positioning of the lower control arm ball studs to the knuckles, the cooling module support bushings, the engine strut bracket and the transaxle mount.

  8. Insert 9/16 inch round steel rods into the cradle-to-body alignment holes, near the front cradle-to-body fastener holes.

  9. Tighten the 4 cradle-to-body mounting bolts to 155 ft. lbs. (210 Nm). Remove the support dolly, then the engine support bar assembly.

  10. For 1992-98 vehicles, tighten the transaxle strut-to-cradle bracket through-bolt and nut to 52 ft. lbs. (70 Nm).

  11. Remove the radiator assembly support wire.

  12. Tighten the new ignition module bolts, with sealant, to 71 inch lbs. (8 Nm) and verify that the bolt heads are properly seated on the ignition module.

  13. Tighten the 2 top clutch housing-to-engine studs to 74 ft. lbs. (100 Nm). Tighten the 2 ground terminals to 19 ft. lbs. (25 Nm).

  14. Install the 2 slave cylinder-to-clutch housing nuts and tighten to 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm).

  15. Tighten the battery tray assembly bolts to 89 inch lbs. (10 Nm).

  16. For 1991 vehicles, tighten the front transaxle mount-to-transaxle bolts and install the front transaxle mount cradle nuts. Tighten the fasteners to 35 ft. lbs. (48 Nm). Then, install the right side mount-to-cradle nuts and tighten to 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm).

  17. For 1992-98 vehicles, tighten the transaxle lower mount-to-cradle fastener and the 2 engine strut cradle bracket-to-cradle nuts to 37 ft. lbs. (50 Nm).

  18. Tighten the steering gear bolts and nuts to 37 ft. lbs. (50 Nm).

  19. Tighten the clutch housing dust cover fasteners to 97 inch lbs. (11 Nm).

  20. Tighten the powertrain stiffening bracket bolts to 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm).

  21. Tighten the exhaust manifold-to-exhaust pipe retaining nuts in a crosswise pattern to 23 ft. lbs. (31 Nm). Tighten the front pipe-to-catalytic converter flange bolts to 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm). Finally, tighten the front pipe-to-engine support bracket fasteners to 23 ft. lbs. (31 Nm).

If the converter flange threads are damaged, use the Saturn 21010753 converter fastener kit in place of the self-tapping screws to provide proper clamp load and prevent exhaust leaks.

  1. Tighten the ball joint nuts to 55 ft. lbs. (75 Nm). Continue to tighten the nuts as necessary and install new cotter pins.

  2. For coupes, install the right left lower facia braces, J-nuts and fasteners. Tighten the fasteners to 89 inch lbs. (10 Nm).

  3. Install the tire and wheel assemblies, then remove the jackstands and lower the vehicle.

  4. Throroughly inspect the transaxle and engine compartment area to be sure that all wires, hoses and lines have been connected. Also inspect to make sure that all components and fasteners have been properly installed.

  5. Connect the positive battery cable first, then the negative cable, and fill the transaxle to the proper level using Saturn transaxle fluid or equivalent.

  6. Properly enable the SIR system, if equipped.

  7. Warm the engine and check the transaxle fluid. Check and adjust front end alignment, as necessary.

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 1: Remove the electrical wiring from the transaxle assembly

 

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 2: Saturn engine support bar assembly-part no. SA9105E

 

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 3: When installing an engine support, position the bar hooks to the engine support brackets

 

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 4: Remove the front engine strut cradle bracket-to-cradle nuts-1992-93 vehicles

 

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 5: Installing the engine cradle to the vehicle spaceframe

 

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 6: Position the steering rack to the cradle and secure using the fasteners

 

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 7: Install the brake line and retaining clip to the cradle

  1. Remove the transaxle from the vehicle.

  2. Unsnap the release fork from the ball stud, then remove the fork and bearing from the vehicle. Slide the bearing from the fork. The bearing should be checked for excessive play and for minimal bearing drag. It should be replaced if no/little drag or excessive play is found.

The release bearing is packed with grease and should not be washed with solvent.

  1. Using a feeler gauge, measure the distance between the pressure plate and flywheel surfaces in order to determine clutch face thickness. Replace the clutch disc if it is not within specification, 0.205-0.287 in. (5.2-7.3mm).

  2. Remove the pressure plate-to-flywheel bolts in a progressive crisscross pattern to prevent warping the cover, then remove the pressure plate and clutch disc.

  3. Inspect the pressure plate, as follows:

    1. Check for excessive wear, chatter marks, cracks or overheating (indicated by a blue discoloration). Black random spots on the friction surface of the pressure plate is normal.

    2. Check the plate for warpage using a straightedge and a feeler gauge; the maximum allowable warpage is 0.006 in. (0.15mm).

    3. Replace the plate, if necessary.

  4. Inspect the clutch disc, as follows:

    1. Check the disc face for oil or burnt spots.

    2. Check the disc for loose damper springs, hub or rivets.

    3. Replace the disc, if necessary.

  5. Check the flywheel, as follows:

    1. Check the ring gear for wear or damage.

    2. Check the friction surface for excessive wear, chatter marks, cracks or overheating (indicated by a blue discoloration). Black random spots on the friction surface of the pressure plate is normal.

    3. Check flywheel thickness; the minimum allowable is 1.102 in. (28mm).

    4. Measure flywheel run-out using a dial indicator, positioned for at least 2 flywheel revolutions. Push the crankshaft forward to take up thrust bearing clearance. Maximum flywheel run-out is 0.006 in. (0.15mm).

    5. Check the flywheel for warpage using a straightedge and a feeler gauge; the maximum allowable warpage is 0.006 in. (0.15mm).

    6. Replace the flywheel, if necessary.

  6. If necessary, remove the flywheel retaining bolts and remove the flywheel from the crankshaft.

To install:

  1. If removed, install the flywheel and tighten the bolts in a crisscross sequence to 59 ft. lbs. (80 Nm).

  2. Install the clutch disc and pressure plate with the yellow dot on the pressure plate aligned as close as possible to the mark on the flywheel. The clutch disc is labeled FLYWHEEL SIDE in order to help correctly position the disc. Start the pressure plate bolts.

  3. Install clutch alignment tool SA9145T or equivalent in the clutch disc, and push in until it bottoms out in the crankshaft.

  4. Tighten the pressure plate bolts using multiple passes of a crisscross sequence to 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm) and remove the alignment tool.

  5. Lubricate the fork pivot point with high temperature grease and install the release bearing to the fork. Do not lubricate the release bearing or bearing quill.

  6. Snap the release bearing and fork onto the ball stud.

  7. Lubricate the splines of the input shaft lightly with a high temperature grease.

  8. Install the transaxle assembly.

  9. Connect the negative battery cable and, if equipped, properly enable the SIR system.

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 1: Slide the bearing from the release fork


Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 2: Check the pressure plate for warpage


Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 3: Check the clutch disc for oil or burnt spots and check for loose springs, hub or rivets


Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 4: Inspect the flywheel ring gear for damage and the contact surface for wear


Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 5: Measure flywheel run-out using a dial indicator


Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 6: If removed, install the flywheel and tighten the mounting bolts in a crisscross pattern to specifications


Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 7: Install a proper clutch alignment tool before tightening the pressure plate retaining bolts



ADJUSTMENTS

Pedal Height/Travel Diagnosis

See Figures 8, 9 and 10

The hydraulic clutch system is self-adjusting; therefore, no manual clutch pedal adjustments are necessary or possible. However, because the pedal travel is directly related to the clutch fork travel, the operating condition of the hydraulic system may be checked using clutch pedal travel.

  1. Use a straightedge horizontally positioned from the center of the clutch pedal to the driver' seat, then depress the clutch pedal and measure pedal travel. The clutch pedal travel should be 5.3-6.2 in. (135-156mm). If the pedal travel is insufficient, look for an obvious cause, such as carpet or a floor mat blocking the pedal or a faulty/damaged pedal.

  2. Through the access hole on the side of the transaxle (immediately to the right of the slave cylinder), use a caliper or depth gauge to measure travel of the clutch fork with the pedal in the full up and full down positions. Subtract the full down measurement from the full up figure to determine fork travel.

If no caliper or depth gauge is available, use a round wire rod in the access hole and mark the pedal up/down positions. Then measure the distance between the 2 marks to determine fork travel.

  1. Compare the fork and pedal travel measurements using the chart.

  2. If fork travel is less than the minimum allowable, check the following. (Conditions a, b and e require replacement of the master/slave cylinder assembly:

    1. Fluid leaks in the hydraulic system.

    2. Air in the system.

    3. Improper installation of the master/slave cylinder.

    4. Damaged master or slave cylinder.

    5. Damage to the front of the dashboard.

  3. If fork travel is acceptable and the hydraulics are working properly, check for a bent fork or damaged pressure plate, which may cause the improper pedal travel.

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 8: Use a straightedge to measure pedal travel


Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 9: An access hole is provided in the transaxle housing, in order to measure fork travel


Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 10: Compare fork and pedal travel using the chart


 

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