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Tim Basham
Tim Basham, ASE Certified Master Technician
Category: Car
Satisfied Customers: 743
Experience:  30 year multi line tech ASE cert master tech ASE engine machinist. Specializing in 4WD +++
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honda accord timing chain

Resolved Question:

i have a 1997 honda accord 4 cyl. with automatic i need to change the timing belt how difficult of a job is this also is there anything i need to look out for when i do this so the car will run correctly when its done....... also how many hrs. do you think it should take i work on older cars and classic so im experience in the automotive field thanks dave
Submitted: 7 years ago.
Category: Car
Expert:  Tim Basham replied 7 years ago.


Labor time calls for 3.4 hrs plus .5 to replace water pump .2 for power steering 1.2 for top mount a/c


1990–95 4-Cylinder Accord and 1992–95 Prelude


  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Turn the engine to align the timing marks and set cylinder No. 1 to TDC on the compression stroke. Once in this position, the engine must NOT be turned or disturbed. On DOHC Preludes without VTEC, hold each of the camshafts in the TDC position by inserting 5mm diameter punches into the alignment holes just behind each cam pulley.
  3. Remove the splash shield from below the engine.
  4. Drain the engine coolant. Use a clean container; cap or cover the container and wipe up spillage.
  5. Unplug the electrical connector at the cruise control actuator, then remove the actuator. Don't disconnect the cable; simply move the actuator out of the work area.
  6. Remove the belt from the power steering pump. Remove the mounting bolts for the pump. Without disconnecting the hoses, move the pump out of the way.
  7. Unplug the alternator wiring and connectors; remove the engine wiring harness from the valve cover.
  8. Loosen the adjusting and mounting bolts for the alternator and/or compressor. Remove the drive belt(s).
  9. Remove the valve cover.
  10. Remove the side engine mount support bracket, if equipped.
  11. Remove the upper timing belt cover.
  12. Support the engine with a floor jack on the oil pan (use a cushion between the jack and pan). Tension the jack so that it is just supporting the engine but not lifting it.
  13. Remove the side engine mount.
  14. Remove the dipstick and dipstick tube.
  15. Remove the crankshaft pulley bolt and remove the crankshaft pulley.

    NOTE: This bolt is one of the tightest on the entire car. The pulley must be held in place while the bolt is loosened. One trick is to wrap an old drive belt around the pulley to hold it steady — don't try this with a belt that is to go back on the car; it will be stretched or damaged.


  16. If necessary for additional clearance to remove the lower timing belt cover, remove the two rear bolts from the center beam. Slowly lower the jack and the engine until the clearance is gained.
  17. Remove the rubber seal from around the belt tension adjusting nut (do not loosen the nut). Remove the lower timing belt cover.
  18. On all models except Prelude with VTEC, lock the timing belt adjuster arm in place using one of the lower cover (6 x 1mm) mounting bolts.


    Fig. 10: On all engines except VTEC, the belt adjuster arm must be locked in place using one of the lower cover mounting bolts

    http://arrc.epnet.com/autoapp/8680/chiltonimages/8680/86803136L.gif


    NOTE: There are two belts in this system; the one running to the camshaft pulley is the timing belt. The other, shorter one drives the balance shaft and is referred to as the balancer belt or timing balancer belt. Use a piece of chalk or a marker to place an identifying arrow on the belts. The arrow can identify the direction of rotation or the outer edge of the belts. The belts must be reinstalled so it moves in the same direction. Protect the belts from oil, coolant, etc. It's an even better idea to replace the belts at this point.



  19. Loosen the timing belt adjustment nut. Push on the tensioner to relieve tension from the balancer belt, then tighten the nut. Remove the balancer belt.
  20. On all models except Prelude with VTEC, loosen the lockbolt installed earlier and the adjusting nut. Push on the tensioner to release the timing belt, then tighten the nut. Carefully remove the timing belt. On Prelude VTEC models, remove the timing belt from the pulleys, then remove the bolts securing the auto-tensioner. Remove the auto-tensioner from the engine.

    To install:


  21. Check the position of the timing marks. The timing pointer must be perfectly aligned with the TDC (white mark) on the flywheel or flex-plate; the camshaft pulley must be aligned so that the word UP is at the top of the pulley and the marks on the edge of the pulley are aligned with the surfaces of the head. Additionally, the face of the front timing balancer pulley has a mark which must be aligned with the notch on the oil pump body. This pulley is the one to the left crank when viewed from the pulley end.
  22. Fit the timing belt over the pulleys and tensioner. On DOHC engines without VTEC, remove the 5mm pin punches from behind the cam pulleys.
  23. Except Prelude VTEC models:

    1. Temporarily install the crank pulley and bolt.
    2. Loosen the tensioner adjusting nut 1 turn, then tighten it. Rotate the crankshaft counterclockwise until the camshaft pulley has moved 3 teeth to create tension on the belt. Loosen the nut again, then tighten it to 33 ft. lbs. (45 Nm).

      NOTE: Always rotate the crankshaft counterclockwise when viewed from the pulley end. Rotating it clockwise will cause improper adjustment and possible damage.


    3. Tighten the lockbolt installed earlier to lock the timing belt adjuster arm. Remove the crank pulley.

  24. On Prelude VTEC models:

    1. Hold the auto-tensioner with the maintenance bolt facing up. Loosen and remove the bolt.

      NOTE: Handle the tensioner carefully so the oil inside does not spill or leak. Replenish with clean engine oil if any does leak. Total capacity is 14 fl. oz. (8 ml).


    2. Clamp the mounting flange of the tensioner in a vise using a cloth or blocks of wood to protect it. Insert a flat blade screwdriver into the maintenance hole. Place the stopper (tool number 14540-P13-003) or an equivalent clamp on the tensioner, then turn the screwdriver clockwise to compress the bottom. Be careful not to damage the threads or the gasket contact surface.
    3. Install the maintenance bolt on the tensioner with a new gasket. Tighten to 6 ft. lbs. (8 Nm).
    4. Make sure no oil is leaking from around the maintenance bolt, then install the tensioner on the engine. Make sure the stopper stays in place and tighten the bolts to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm).
    5. Remove the stopper.


      Fig. 11: On VTEC engines, the tensioner must be compressed before installing it on the engine

      http://arrc.epnet.com/autoapp/8680/chiltonimages/8680/86803137L.gif



      Fig. 12: Remove the stopper after installing the tensioner on the engine

      http://arrc.epnet.com/autoapp/8680/chiltonimages/8680/86803138L.gif



  25. Make sure all timing marks are positioned correctly (as described earlier).
  26. Align the rear timing balancer pulley (to the right of the crank pulley) using a 6x100mm bolt or rod. Mark the bolt or rod at a point 2.913 in. (74mm) from the end. Remove the bolt from the maintenance hole on the side of the block; insert the rod into the hole. Align the 74mm mark with the face of the hole. This pin will hold the shaft in place during installation.
  27. Loosen the tensioner adjusting nut and verify that the timing balancer belt adjuster moves freely.


    Fig. 13: The balancer shaft must be held in position during timing belt installation

    http://arrc.epnet.com/autoapp/8680/chiltonimages/8680/86803139L.gif



  28. Fit the balancer belt over the pulleys. Remove the bolt or rod from the maintenance hole.
  29. Temporarily install the crank pulley. Rotate the engine one turn counterclockwise, then tighten the tensioner adjusting nut to 33 ft. lbs. (45 Nm). Double check the positions of the timing marks and make sure they still line up. If not remove the belts and repeat the procedures.

    NOTE: Both belt adjusters are spring-loaded to properly tension the belts. Do not apply any additional pressure to the pulleys or tensioners while performing the adjustment.


  30. Remove the crank pulley. Remove the lockbolt installed earlier on the timing belt adjuster arm. Install the maintenance bolt with a new washer. Tighten it to 22 ft. lbs. (30 Nm).
  31. Install the lower cover, making certain the rubber seals are in place and correctly located. Tighten the retaining bolts to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm).
  32. If applicable, raise the lower beam and engine into place. Install the rear bolts for the lower beam. Tighten them to 28 ft. lbs. (39 Nm) on 1990–91 Accords, 37 ft. lbs. (50 Nm) on 1992–95 Accords and 43 ft. lbs. (60 Nm) on 1992–95 Preludes.
  33. Install the key on the crankshaft and install the crankshaft pulley. Apply oil to the bolt threads and tighten it to the following:

    • 1990 Accord: 166 ft. lbs. (230 Nm)
    • 1991–93 Accord: 159 ft. lbs. (220 Nm)
    • 1992–93 Prelude: 159 ft. lbs. (220 Nm)
    • 1994–95 Accord and Prelude: 181 ft. lbs. (245 Nm)

  34. Install the dipstick tube and dipstick.
  35. Install the side engine mount (refer to engine removal and installation for procedures). Remove the jack from under the engine.
  36. Install the upper belt cover.
  37. Install the side engine mount support bracket if it was removed.
  38. Install the valve cover.
  39. Install the compressor and/or alternator drive belt; adjust the tension.
  40. Route the wiring harness over the valve cover and connect the wiring to the alternator.
  41. Install the power steering pump and install the belt.
  42. Reinstall the cruise control actuator. Connect the vacuum hose and the electrical connector.
  43. Double check all installation items, paying particular attention to loose hoses or hanging wires, untightened nuts, poor routing of hoses and wires (too tight or rubbing) and tools left in the engine area.
  44. Refill the engine coolant.
  45. Install the splash shield under the engine.
  46. Connect the negative battery cable.
  47. Start the engine, allowing it to idle. Check for any signs of leakage or any sound of the belts rubbing or binding.
~

Tim Basham, ASE Certified Master Technician
Category: Car
Satisfied Customers: 743
Experience: 30 year multi line tech ASE cert master tech ASE engine machinist. Specializing in 4WD +++
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