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Legal Ease
Legal Ease, Lawyer
Category: Canada Law
Satisfied Customers: 95904
Experience:  Lawyer
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I recently resigned my position and had an employment

Customer Question

I recently resigned my position and had an employment agreement that stated that I turn in any and all confidential items such as customer lists, etc. I didn't have access to the company financials, sales data or inventory records. I purchased my own notepads and recorded certain things in the books such as who I met, what they needed, etc according to my meetings on those days. There was nothing proprietary in these recordings other than my own notes. Does this become my employers property when I leave? They have withheld my final pay which comprises of my two weeks notice and vacation accrual until I had these books over.
Submitted: 3 months ago.
Category: Canada Law
Expert:  Legal Ease replied 3 months ago.

Do they have confidential information or contact information etc?

Why do you want them?

Why do they want them?

Customer: replied 3 months ago.
Its not the point. Do they have legal entitlement to notes recorded in my own notepads....enough to hold my two weeks nitice and vacation accrual?
Expert:  Legal Ease replied 3 months ago.

What is clear is that no matter what you have they cannot withhold your pay or the vacation pay either.

That is not anything they can succeed in doing.

You can contact the Employment Standards Branch and they will get your pay and vacation pay as well.

But they can try and come after you and sue you for the notebooks. I am not saying they will but they could.

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