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Legal Ease
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Category: Canada Law
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Ontario, Canada - I submitted a medical claim to my boss on

Customer Question

Ontario, Canada - I submitted a medical claim to my boss on my last job for $995 (it included receipts for medication and some therapy sessions). According to my job offer letter, I had coverage for up to $1500 per year. There was no other documentation about the company's medical coverage (I'd asked about it on a couple of occasions). I ended up resigning and giving 3 weeks notice the next day. I worked those final 3 weeks and, after I left the company, I emailed my old boss to find out why I hadn't received payment. His email response back explained that they would pay me based on the coverage I had accumulated given that I'd been on the job less than 3 months when I resigned. It's been 6 weeks and I have not heard anything more about it or received payment. Am I entitled to getting this money back given that I'd been on the job for a short time and quit the day after I submitted the claim? Please note that I was told by my boss that I could submit claims immediately (no waiting period).
Submitted: 5 months ago.
Category: Canada Law
Expert:  Legal Ease replied 5 months ago.

Unless your job letter states otherwise, or unless you signed a contract that states otherwise you are entitled to the full coverage as there is simply no provision that says you have to work a certain length of time to acquire the right to receive the full benefits.

So if there is nothing that states this you can sue the employer in Small Claims Court if you are not reimbursed in full.

Let me know if you need any further clarification.

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