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Legal Ease
Legal Ease, Lawyer
Category: Canada Law
Satisfied Customers: 96432
Experience:  Lawyer
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How do i figure out my rights and what am entitled to in

Customer Question

How do i figure out my rights and what am entitled to in Alimony?
Submitted: 9 months ago.
Category: Canada Law
Expert:  Legal Ease replied 9 months ago.

Please provide me with more information.

In particular I need to know what province you live in, how long you been married for, if you lived together how long you did live together for and also I need to know your gross income and your spouse's gross income and whether your spouse supported you during the marriage and whether there are children etc.

Customer: replied 9 months ago.
We live in Newfoundland, married for 16 yrs lived together for 20, I am self employed have a salon here in my house basically work part time hrs, my husband works away so we like for my scheduke to be flexible when he is home, I make 5000- 6000 a yr, my Husbands gross is about $125000 so yes he supports me and we have no kids.
Customer: replied 9 months ago.
I am scared now when we seperate I am not going to be able to live on my own.
Customer: replied 9 months ago.
Hello, are you still there?
Customer: replied 9 months ago.
Still waiting on an answer.
Expert:  Legal Ease replied 9 months ago.

Your marriage is considered to be lengthy and given that you lived together first you will be considered to have been spouses for twenty years.

As such spousal support will go on indefinitely in most cases and the goal of the court will be to equalize your incomes.

Here is a free online support calculator that will give you an excellent idea of the range of what the support may be:

http://mysupportcalculator.ca/

Let me know if you need any further clarification.

Customer: replied 9 months ago.
You say in most cases? How would property be split?
Expert:  Legal Ease replied 9 months ago.

Yes I say in most cases because the law is very uncertain in this area and so there are just no guarantees.

For property you would each share equally in the value of all assets acquired during the marriage aside from gifts and inheritances and also share equally in the increase in value of any assets brought into the marriage.

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