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Legal Ease
Legal Ease, Lawyer
Category: Canada Law
Satisfied Customers: 96404
Experience:  Lawyer
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I had my place broken into a few months back and pretty

Customer Question

Hi, I had my place broken into a few months back and pretty much all of my possessions were taken, among them was my Nintendo video game console. The next day the burglars were using the console online to watch Netflix and play games, and they have been doing so pretty much everyday since they stole it. My nephew contacted Nintendo about this and they responded saying they would be able to give us the IP address if we sent them a subpoena, I informed this police about this and have heard nothing back in almost 3 months, I sent a follow up e-mail to my responding officer about a month ago and still nothing. So now I'm curious if there is any way I can get the subpoena myself to send to Nintendo??
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Canada Law
Expert:  Legal Ease replied 1 year ago.
It may be possible to get this from the Court but that would involve a lawsuit. It is not likely possible to get one without suing. But the police should be doing this for you and so I suggest that you ask to speak to the supervisor of the station and explain what is happening. This goes beyond your nintendo because they can clearly catch the thieves this way. If that doesn't work I suggest that you retain a lawyer to speak to the police for you. That will not cost much but retaining a lawyer to get a court order will be very expensive unfortunately.

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