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Tom B.
Tom B., Barrister & Solicitor
Category: Canada Family Law
Satisfied Customers: 78
Experience:  25 years in practice.
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Our adult son wishes to remove s wife from s will as the

Customer Question

Our adult son wishes to remove his wife from his will as the only beneficiary. He wishes every thing he has, left to his son age 18 (in trust until he is 25). There is a trusty in place.
He has already changed his beneficiary for his Life insurance, his personnel investments, and his RRSP through his work.
Our family lawyer who drew up the first document, has told him he can not remover her as his beneficiary. They both own the family home jointly. The only change that appears will be made is to remove any of his wife's family members that were mentioned in the first will. We (our son and his parents) really do not understand what our family lawyer is talking about.
Submitted: 6 months ago.
Category: Canada Family Law
Expert:  ulysses101 replied 6 months ago.

Hello, thank you for the question.

What province are you in?

When you refer to the "first document" drawn up by your family lawyer, what document is that?

Is that the will you mention?

Customer: replied 6 months ago.
Ontario
It is his "first" will, 10 year ago
Yes
Customer: replied 6 months ago.
She has caused a great deal of financial hardship. He just wants to make sure is son is taken care of, and not by her.
Expert:  ulysses101 replied 6 months ago.

Is she the mother of this son?

Is she aware of his intention? Are they separated?

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