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Ask Law Educator, Esq. Your Own Question
Law Educator, Esq.
Law Educator, Esq., Attorney
Category: California Employment Law
Satisfied Customers: 111600
Experience:  JA Mentor -Attorney Labor/employment, corporate, sports law, admiralty/maritime and civil rights law
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Was slapped in the face by supervisor and then the

Customer Question

Was slapped in the face by supervisor and then the organizationretaliated against me for making the complaint. Would like to know the amount of damages that I can request from the court.
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: California Employment Law
Expert:  Law Educator, Esq. replied 1 year ago.

Thank you for your question. I look forward to working with you to provide you the information you are seeking for educational purposes only.

Slapping you is a battery, it is a criminal offense and you could make a criminal complaint as well, if you have not already. If the employer is retaliating against you for reporting a battery, then this would be unlawful retaliation and you would be entitled to recover your actual damages, plus emotional distress. So your actual damages would be any loss of wages or income and then your emotional distress can be 3-4 times your actual damages. So you need to do your calculations of what you have actually lost as a result of their action and then you would need to determine the emotional or punitive type of damages regarding this. If there were no actual damages and only emotional or punitive damages, these cases are worth typically anywhere between $10,000 and $150,000, depending on the severity of the retaliation itself.

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