How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask socrateaser Your Own Question
socrateaser
socrateaser, Lawyer
Category: California Employment Law
Satisfied Customers: 38438
Experience:  Retired (mostly)
10097515
Type Your California Employment Law Question Here...
socrateaser is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

Hi, Can you please inform me, or give me a website to view

This answer was rated:

Hi, Can you please inform me, or give me a website to view to know what the California labor laws are for a full time housekeeper (paid thru my company on an 8 hour day pay schedule) but to also pet sit 24 hours (On Call) a day for a few weeks while on vacation? Thank you! I would much prefer a phone conversation if possible. Thank you,

Heather Black XXX-XXX-XXXX

Hello,

The current California laws for domestic workers are found in IWC Order #15-2001.

Note that on Jan 1, 2014, California AB 241 will modify the IWC Order to require that employers pay domestic workers 1 1/2 their regular rate of pay for all hours over 9 in any day; and for more than 45 hours in any workweek.

Pet sitting would reasonably fall within the same IWC Order, because the work is being performed for a private home.

Please let me know if my answer is helpful, or if I can provide further clarification or assistance. And, thanks for using jusanswer.com!

socrateaser and other California Employment Law Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 3 years ago.


Hi, I appreciate your response, however can you clarify "on Call" duty also? If an employee is responsible to be "on Call" for 24 hours, but only needs to work maybe a total of 8 hours within the 24 hours, how is this clarified to be legit? Also, what if the employee is a "live in", ie. we allow our housekeeper to live at our house, but expect she is to perform duties, when we need her to. ( We only live at this house 1 or 2 nights a week, plus we travel a lot and need her to watch our dog for 2 months at a time, so this is a tricky situation) I know this is a grey area, but want to be fair and understand state rules. Thank you for your help.

Hi, I appreciate your response, however can you clarify "on Call" duty also? If an employee is responsible to be "on Call" for 24 hours, but only needs to work maybe a total of 8 hours within the 24 hours, how is this clarified to be legit?

A: On Call/waiting time is controlled by a two-factor test: (1) the parties' agreement; and (2) the degree to which the employee is free to engage in personal activities. Gomez v. Lincare, Inc. (2009) 173 CA4th 508, 522.

The difficulty with an on-call worker usually arises where the employee is required to remain close to the employment site, but does not actually reside in the worksite. There is no bright-line rule here, but where an off-site employee must report within less than 30 minutes from a call, it is likely that the employee is not free to engage in personal activities, and so he/she must be paid as if actually working. Id., at 523; IWC Order #15-2001 § 3(C).

Also, what if the employee is a "live in", ie. we allow our housekeeper to live at our house, but expect she is to perform duties, when we need her to. ( We only live at this house 1 or 2 nights a week, plus we travel a lot and need her to watch our dog for 2 months at a time, so this is a tricky situation) I know this is a grey area, but want to be fair and understand state rules. Thank you for your help.

A: Where the employee is a "live-in," the primary rules are found in IWC Order #15-2001 § 3(A). Example: Employee is on a 12-hour free-time period, and receives a reporting call. If employee is required to report within less than 30 minutes, then the employee was not actually on free time, so all of the 12 hours is compensible. Regardless of the on-call rules, the employee must have at least 3 hours of unrestricted free time during the 12 hour free-time period.

The rules are admittedly complicated. Perhaps there is a software payroll application that would permit your employee to clock in and out and then automatically calculate the employee's pay. If not, then all you can do is carefully review IWC Order #15-2001 § 3, and when in doubt -- pay extra compensation.

The reason why these laws are so onerous is because too many times, household workers are undocumented aliens who are effectively enslaved into working for their employer around the clock, for less than minimum wage, without any benefits (unemployment ins.; State Disability Insurance, etc.). The DLSE takes and vigorously prosecutes complaints from household workers, whether or not they have legal work status in the USA.

When in doubt, overpay your employee and provide additional free time. Also, log work time into some sort of timecard system, so that you can prove the employee's work and pay. If you do not do this, and the employee complains to DLSE, then the judge will inevitably give the employee's testimony greater weight, and you will lose -- because the law requires that you maintain accurate payroll records.

Hope this helps.

Related California Employment Law Questions