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socrateaser
socrateaser, Lawyer
Category: California Employment Law
Satisfied Customers: 37960
Experience:  Retired (mostly)
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So if I formally quit my employer, could I then lay claim to

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So if I formally quit my employer, could I then lay claim to the work I've done with the studio for the LAST 3 weeks, the period for which I have not been paid yet, and be clear of the competing code? Or would quitting simply mean I could lay claim to the FUTURE work only? I understand he wouldn't pay, but billing the studio directly would the loses.

Also, the advances were done for all employees. His way of "making payroll" without actually doing so. He didn't have the money to run payroll, meaning pay both the employee and the government. So I'm not sure where that would fall in your description of the use of the "advances" above.
Hello again,

Would you please provide a positive rating for my numerous answers in our previous Q&A session, before we start another conversation?

Otherwise, I receive no compensation for my efforts.

Thanks in advance.
Looks like you did that already. Sorry, but I never received any notice from the system. You asked:

So if I formally quit my employer, could I then lay claim to the work I've done with the studio for the LAST 3 weeks, the period for which I have not been paid yet, and be clear of the competing code? Or would quitting simply mean I could lay claim to the FUTURE work only? I understand he wouldn't pay, but billing the studio directly would the loses.

A: You can only claim future work, from the date of your resignation of employment.

Also, the advances were done for all employees. His way of "making payroll" without actually doing so. He didn't have the money to run payroll, meaning pay both the employee and the government. So I'm not sure where that would fall in your description of the use of the "advances" above.

A: Based on your description, the employer appears to be engaged in tax evasion (ed. op.). The payments are not advances, because they are not made in contemplation of future services rendered.

Hope this helps.

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