How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask socrateaser Your Own Question
socrateaser
socrateaser, Lawyer
Category: California Employment Law
Satisfied Customers: 38560
Experience:  Retired (mostly)
10097515
Type Your California Employment Law Question Here...
socrateaser is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

Hi Socrateaser, They are using basic interrogation method.

This answer was rated:

Hi Socrateaser,

They are using basic interrogation method. They keep asking me the same questions. But I keep saying the same thing. So when I wanted to tell them I quit...At the same time, they let me go. They asked me to sign 2 documents: One was saying I was not loyal and I didn't sign it, because I said to them I see it as 2 friends that are in a relationship, where the girl told me not to tell anyone she wants to break up and at the same time if the guy tell me not to saying anything to anyone, I will also honor that conversation. However, my manager that I never got to know sign it with his manager as the witness. The other document that I did sign was saying I got my package, check, problem resolution process, EDD, health benefits, and turn in my belongings.
Should I fill out the problem resolution process?
Should I send you a copy of the problem resolution process?
What do I need to look for while applying for another job, such as, be up-front and tell them what happen or?
Please advice and please provide your thoughts?
Thanks.
Should I fill out the problem resolution process?

A: If you have been terminated, then there is no problem resolution process, because your former employer has no duty to assist you further in any manner.

Should I send you a copy of the problem resolution process?

A: I don't see any reason to review the document.

What do I need to look for while applying for another job, such as, be up-front and tell them what happen or?

A: You don't have to say anything about your prior employment. If you're asked, you can simply say that it was time to move on.

Please advice and please provide your thoughts?

A: There's nothing to do, other than to seek new employment. You owe the former employer nothing -- and it owes you nothing.

Hope this helps.

NOTICE: My goal here is to educate others about the law. I am always available to answer your follow-up questions after you click Accept – however, if you do not click Accept, the website gets paid, and I receive nothing. This is true, even if you are on a subscription plan. So please click Accept, so that I will be able to continue to provide this service for others in the future.


And, if you need to contact me again, please put my user id on the title line of your question (“To Socrateaser”), and the system will send me an alert. Thanks!

Customer: replied 5 years ago.

To Socrateaser,

 

Thank you for your advice!

Actually I wanted to quit...It is time for me to move on, because they have no more projects for me, since they will move everyone that has join them into another EHR application. The groups that decided not to join, the groups that didn't get pick to join, and the groups that was not even part of the plan are looking for options, because they really need an EHR application. It is the future for healthcare.

If the huge groups really can unify to use an EHR application, but remain independent and they ask me to consult them to setup their own EHR application, I will reward you and I will need more advice from you.

If I get new employment, I will reward you too.

Oh, what if the new employer contacts my previous employer?

Thanks.

 

 

If the new employer contacts your former employer, and the result is that you are not employed, then you may have a legal action against the former employer for both defamation of character, and intentional interference with prospective economic relations.

There is qualified immunity to a former employer under Civil Code 47(c)(3), to the extent that the employer may state whether or not it would rehire a former employee. However, conversations which exceed this scope can create legal liability for the former employer. Thus, it is rare that a former employer will do more than state that a former employee was employed by the employer, and the date of that former employee's last day of employment.

So, I wouldn't worry about this issue until you are actually injured by the former employer's actions.

Hope this helps.
socrateaser and other California Employment Law Specialists are ready to help you

Related California Employment Law Questions