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Loren
Loren, Attorney
Category: Business Law
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Experience:  30 years experience representing clients .
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Could use some advice: Is it uncommon for Literary Agents

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Could use some advice:

Is it uncommon for Literary Agents to sign an author who has a previous co-authored work, withOUT a release from the secondary author (myself)?

I have received a secondary co-author credit for having written the majority (95%) of an 'auto'biographical, self-published book as a work-for-hire (no rights retained). The subject is the primary author. He would now like to sign with an interested literary agent, to seek a mainline publisher, and states that the literary agent will not accept him or a new project, unless I sign an agreement to waive my co-author's credit so the author himself can stand alone with representation.

I am wondering if this is a common demand by literary agents? And why I would even need to sign off if this is a new work (ghostwritten by a new person), though supported by our previous book. I have no agreement for royalties or profit on the first work, only an entitlement to secondary co-author credit.

Is this a typical agent request? What would you advise me?

Thanks.
Hi, I’m a moderator for this topic and I wonder whether you’re still waiting for an answer. If you are, please let me know and I will do my best to find a professional to assist you right away. If not, feel free to let me know and I will cancel this question for you. Thank you!
Customer: replied 4 years ago.
yes, I am still waiting for an answer-
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The agent is seeking to cut off any claims you would possibly assert under copyright claims for any derivative use or work. It is not an unusual request.
Customer: replied 4 years ago.
I am not surprised. But is this ethical? Does the author/writer have any recourse?
It is ethical The only recourse is to negotiate the terms with the agent or refuse to sign.
Loren, Attorney
Category: Business Law
Satisfied Customers: 29823
Experience: 30 years experience representing clients .
Loren and 3 other Business Law Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 4 years ago.
I see. what if they are unwilling to negotiate? What happens if I refuse to sign because they will not negotiate?
If you refuse to sign then the agent can not go forward.
Loren, Attorney
Category: Business Law
Satisfied Customers: 29823
Experience: 30 years experience representing clients .
Loren and 3 other Business Law Specialists are ready to help you

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