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Dr. Pat
Dr. Pat, Bird Veterinarian
Category: Bird Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 3596
Experience:  25+ years working primarily or exclusively with birds
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I found 2 of 3 young chickens out of their coop unexpectedly

Customer Question

I found 2 of 3 young chickens out of their coop unexpectedly after some probable predator possibly attacked them (there was a small hole noted in one of the sides of the coop). One is still missing...They are 9 weeks old. One seems fine, but one is limping and doesn't want to bare her weight on her left leg. She holds her leg up much of the time, but will place it down then clearly limps. I can see no gross deformity in any of the individual digits or the leg. Any thoughts on how I can help her?
Submitted: 2 months ago.
Category: Bird Veterinary
Expert:  Dr. Bruce replied 2 months ago.

Hi. My name is***** I'm sorry to hear about this situation with Ruby. That can be very frustrating when predators sneak into the enclosure to go after these little ones. Trying to predator proof an enclosure is a challenge. Just when you think it is completely safe, they can find an unexpected way to gain access. Hopefully no more entrances into it will happen after you adjust the security to the enclosure. As far as helping Ruby with her leg, the best thing you can do there is to help her to heal herself with good nutrition, rest, and hydration. Maybe separating her from any other young chickens for a few days to totally let her rest and not be overly stimulated to move / interact. That is good that there are no gross deformities visible. Hopefully this is a soft tissue injury that good nursing care can take care of.

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