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Dr. B.
Dr. B., Bird Veterinarian
Category: Bird Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 16303
Experience:  As a veterinary surgeon, I have spent a lot of time with bird cases and I'm happy to help you.
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One week ago I found my polish rooster laying on his side in

Customer Question

One week ago I found my polish rooster laying on his side in his coop. When I stood him up he wouldn't raise his head up. I looked him over and found he had mites. I dusted him down with poultry dust and when gave him a bath in warm soapy water and rinsed him until I didn't see anymore mites then I used a hair dryer to dry him. He started to improve the next day eating, drinking and pooping but he still can't hold his head up all the way and he moves his head from side to side over and over with his head almost touching the ground until he flips over on his back. He does that on and off all day. What do you think is wrong with him?
Submitted: 7 months ago.
Category: Bird Veterinary
Expert:  Dr. B. replied 7 months ago.
Hello & welcome, I am Dr. B, a licensed veterinarian and I would like to help you today. I do apologize that your question was not answered before. Different experts come online at various times; I just came online, read about your wee one’s situation, and wanted to help. Poor Albert!Now his signs raise a few concerns. Though I have to say that 2 specific ones would be on the top of my list for him. First, if he had a severe mite infestation, this could have caused anemia (low red blood cell levels) such that he is not getting enough oxygen to his brain. This can lead to temporary neurological signs but an also cause permanent damage. And that could cause his neck weakness as well as his neurological head signs. Our other prime concern for his signs would be a head trauma. These can lead to bleeding or swelling in the brain which puts pressure on the brain to again causes changes like those we have seen. Again some will be temporary and reduce as the brain heals but other changes can be permanent.Otherwise, just to note, these sign also fit with toxicity (ie antifreeze, algae, lead or other heavy metals), bacterial infection (ie fowl cholera, botulism etc), meningitis, and some less common agents (ie Marek's disease, sarcocystosis, etc).With all this in mind, we need to tread with care. If you have not already, Albert should be isolated in a small hospitalization pen with easy access to food/water. We'd want to monitor his intakes closely as he may need hand feeding and watering. If we need to boost his intake, we can use a supplement paste (ie Nutrical), electrolytes (ie Vi-tal), and can even use a handfeeding formula (ie Zupreem) if he is struggling. As well, we can may want to speak to his vet about bird safe anti-inflammatories (we'd need to avoid aspirin as it is a blood thinner and thus contraindicated if we have any bleeds in his brain) to reduce the brain signs and see if we can get him stable sooner. Otherwise, as long as we have removed the mites, we can give his body time to replenish red blood cells if they are low and/or reduce brain based changes from trauma to help see if we can get him back to normal. Of course, if he wasn't improving, those other agents would become more of a concern and we may need to get his local vet involved to pinpoint the cause of this for him.Overall, I am glad to hear that he has improved with your treatment so far. From here, we need to keep up on the supportive care but may want to have his vet start anti-inflammatories to make sure that we are reducing any brain pressure cause by inflammation. If we can get him stable, we can give his body time to address the above concerns and hopefully get him back on track. Just in case you do need an avian vet and do not have one already, you can check where you can find one at near you at AAV (http://www.aav.org/search/), Avian web(http://www.beautyofbirds.com/recommendedvets.htm) or Birdsnway(http://www.birdsnways.com/birds/vets.htm). Please take care,Dr. B. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------If you have any other questions, please ask me – I’ll be happy to respond. **Afterwards, I would be grateful if you would rate my service by clicking on the "Rate my Expert' button at the top of the page as this is the only way I am credited for helping you. Thank you for your feedback!: )
Customer: replied 7 months ago.
I've looked online for an Avian Vet in my area and was unable to find one, that's how I found this site. Therefore any treatment or medications will have to be administered by me. Question: can I give him infant ibuprofen as the antinfamatory and if I can how much and how often.
Expert:  Dr. B. replied 7 months ago.
Hi again,That is a shame. In regards ***** ***** question, as long as he is eating, we can try a low dose of ibuprofen. We just need to keep a very close eye on him. In regards ***** ***** our birds can have 5mg per kilogram of their weight every 12 hours. This should be given after food and needs to be stopped if he stops eating or has black stools, pales, or has belly pain. Please take care,Dr. B.-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------If you have any other questions, please ask me – I’ll be happy to respond. **Afterwards, I would be grateful if you would rate my service by clicking on the "Rate my Expert' button at the top of the page as this is the only way I am credited for helping you. Thank you for your feedback!: )

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