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Dr. B.
Dr. B., Bird Veterinarian
Category: Bird Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 18227
Experience:  As a veterinary surgeon, I have spent a lot of time with bird cases and I'm happy to help you.
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BABY BIRD TAKEN FROM NEST BY ROOFERS. WHAT DO i DO?

Customer Question

BABY BIRD TAKEN FROM NEST BY ROOFERS. WHAT DO i DO?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Bird Veterinary
Expert:  Dr. B. replied 1 year ago.
Hello & welcome, I am Dr. B, a licensed veterinarian and I would like to help you today.
Did they move the nest or just remove the bird?
Can the bird be put back?
Do you know what species it is?
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Just the bird. The nest is gone. possiable pigeon or dove,
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Phone call did not work. I am despartet to know what to do for the little bird
Expert:  Dr. B. replied 1 year ago.
Thank you,
First, even if the nest is gone, there is a chance we can get this wee one reunited with its parents. If you can put a faux nest (using a tupperware container or small box with grass/straw/bedding/etc) close to where this bird was found, the parents will come back and feed it. And this is the ideal option, especially as the dove/pigeon nestlings tend to do very poorly in captivity and often will die.
Otherwise, since they are not birds that are easily reared, it would be best to contact your local bird rehabilitation center. You can check the following databases to find a rehabilitation agency are near by:
Wildlife International (http://www.wildlifeinternational.org/EN/public/emergency/emergencyrehab.html),
US Wildlife Rehabilitation (http://www.southeasternoutdoors.com/wildlife/rehabilitators/directory-us.html),
Wildlife Rehabbers (http://wildliferehabber.com/rehabber-search), or
Wildlife Sanctuaries (http://www.greenpeople.org/sanctuary.htm)
These rehabilitators will be best prepared to care for this bird and also will have the permits required to care for wildlife (since in some areas it is against the law to keep wild birds in captivity without a permit).
Alternatively, you can turn this bird over to your local veterinary practice. They will be able to examine/treat him and be able to directly turn him over to the rehabilitation centre (often the vets will have a relationship with the local rehab centre and sometimes are able to get them in even if the facility isn't accepting birds from the public).
While you are sorting care for him, the best thing to do at the moment is take them in and place them in a warm (86-90 degrees F), secluded, dimly lit environment to keep stress low. Water should be provided but again we want to keep everything low key if you have just been given this very likely to be stressed little bird.
Overall, these species of birds are not very amenable to care in captivity. So, the best thing to do is to make a fake nest near where the bird was found so that its parents can regain control/care of it. If that is not possible, then we need to get it to a rehabilitator or local vet to give him the best chance of survival in this situation.
I hope this information is helpful.
If you need any additional information, do not hesitate to ask!
All the best,
Dr. B.
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If you have any other questions, please ask me – I’ll be happy to respond. Please remember to rate my service once you have all the information you need as this is how I am credited for assisting you today. Thank you! : )
Expert:  Dr. B. replied 1 year ago.
Hi,
I'm just following up on our conversation about your pet. How is everything going?
Dr. B.

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