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Ask Dr. Michael Salkin Your Own Question
Dr. Michael Salkin
Dr. Michael Salkin, Veterinarian
Category: Bird Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 24428
Experience:  University of California at Davis graduate veterinarian with 44 years of experience
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I have a hen that has a very large and distended crop. What

Customer Question

I have a young hen that has a very large and distended crop. What do I do?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Bird Veterinary
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I have a young hen that has had a large distended crop for about 4-5 days. It does go down in the morning somewhat, but not much. What do I do? She's my little sweetheart and I don't want anything to happen to her.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I gave her more grit today. I have not let her free range today.
Expert:  Dr. Michael Salkin replied 1 year ago.

How old is your hen in weeks or months, please? My concerns with a pendulous crop include Marek's disease and impaction/sour crop as can be read about here: http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2014/06/chicken-anatomy-crop-impacted-crop-sour.html

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
She is 23 weeks old.
She has been eating and drinking fine.
Still very energetic. Has laid 2 eggs this week (her first 2 eggs).
I have read some about sour crop today online
Expert:  Dr. Michael Salkin replied 1 year ago.

Thank you! I'm neurotic enough to still worry about the internal form of Marek's between the ages of 16-35 weeks. The herpesvirus of Marek's can involve the vagus nerve which innervates the crop. Her behaving well otherwise would belie that diagnosis, however. Are you comfortable milking her crop and then flushing it with water as outlined above in that link? If not, it's best than an avian-oriented vet (please see here: www.aav.org) tend to Georgia or you can simply see how adding more grit (please see here: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000QFSAJW/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B000QFSAJW&linkCode=as2&tag=thechichi-20) affects Georgia.

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I think I can try milking the crop. I have epsom salts here.
I added more grit today.
Expert:  Dr. Michael Salkin replied 1 year ago.

I'm proud of you. I can't set a follow-up in this venue and so would appreciate your returning to our conversation with an update - even after rating - at a time of your choosing.

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I took Georgia to the vet a few weeks ago- after we had this discussion. She put her on Reglan and an antibiotic. She looks pretty good. Crop gets big, but empties. There were no parasites.
She is now off the meds and laying eggs like a champ, but the vet told me that there was an egg withdrawal time. However she keeps saying she'll call me back with it and never does. So what is the egg withdrawal time on metoclopramide/reglan? She told me that there was no egg withdrawal time for the antibiotic.
Expert:  Dr. Michael Salkin replied 1 year ago.

I'm not aware of any which might be why you haven't been contacted again. When there's nothing published concerning a withdrawal time for a drug the general rule is 7 days for eggs and 28 days for meat.

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