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Dr. Jaime
Dr. Jaime, Veterinarian
Category: Bird Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 216
Experience:  Avian/exotic practice owner, 10 yrs. avian rescue, 3yrs. private practice, 2yrs. avian wildlife
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I need a specific answer please as regards tube feeding. I

Customer Question

I need a specific answer please as regards XXXXX XXXXX I had a green cheek conure
who was injured by an African Grey when he landed on the side of the Grey's cage. The Grey's cage is a commercial cage with thick square bars, The Grey is a rescue who needs a beak trim, we are allowing acclimation, the Grey could not get the Conure's head in a complete bite as he had to open his beak a lot to allow for his overgrowth & the commercial bars. The damage was severe but not life threatening. The conure suffered an injury to the corner area of his left eye, not pierced, & an injury to the right beak, far side near his eye which tore the beak away approx 1/8 in & pierced the air sac around the eye. I took him immed. to an emerg clinic, as it was Sunday, that advert. they treated birds. The vet there said she had been avian certified for7 yrs but had not renewed. However, she felt his head & said there were no broken bones. It was obvious that there was no bleeding & if any, it was minor. The main issue was the beak, the air sac had not become evident at this time. She called ahead for us to take him to another branch of their clinic 80 miles away. We took him & by the time we got there, his eye was pulsing with his breathing, & some bruising was evident in the white area around the eye. Mostly he seemed in shock. The vet said his frontal bones were crushed, in direct opposition to her colleague. Her plan was to put him under sedation the next morning to do an xray, bind the beak for healing, put a feeding tube in place & leave it there for four weeks. The tube was to feed to the crop.

The next morning, she called to say she could not find any broken bones on X-ray, did not bind the beak for breathing issues as she felt his right nostril was compromised or destroyed, the air sac most likely would heal fine but if not he would be okay. She put the feeding tube in anyway.

On Wed she called to tell us he was very active, doing great, she was surprised at his recovery & he was ready to go home. We picked him up, he was thrilled to see me. To fill you in, he was two years old, always on a pelleted diet fresh foods & veggies. He was greatly loved & a very special bird. When we picked him up, he was using the beak, talking & loving me. We took him home & kept him in our hospital bin with only a perch & his sleeping tent in it. He was given metacam for pain to be added to his food two times a day, 12 hours apart, .5 mg., and baytril, .08 ml once daily in his food. He was feed kaytee exact HDD 2.5 ml, with a small water push before & after to be sure the tubing was clear. She notes in his discharge papers he is using his beak & tongue. The muscles were intact. My instincts & common sense told me at the time it would have been much better to have fed him the kaytee by mouth with the syringe, but I paid her a thousand bucks and she was the expert, right? I was to feed him every four hours.

On Thurs afternoon, he changed. I felt the tube move oddly when I fed him & he fought the feeding, his stools turned black consistent with blood. This was five days after the injury that was head only & not bleeding. He began to stumble on my shoulder. I called the vet & she said to just watch him. He passed one green stool, then no more. But he fought the feedings. I told her he seemed too skinny. When injured he weighed 69.4 gr and when he left the clinic he weighed much less, autopsy shows no body fat.

Here is what I need from you. The feeding tube was supposed to be in the crop. On autopsy it was found to be in the esophagus leading into the stomach, not in the crop. Understanding that the crop is a storage area for food, and moves food slowly to the stomach for digestion, & also knowing that you can feed a bird with the tube placed directly into the stomach but with a much lesser amount pushed in at each feeding, I need some answers.

As the stomach is a two part process, a small stomach that starts digestion with enzymes and then passes the food to the gizzard to be ground & distributed to the liver, etc, how much would a person tube feed a small green cheek if feeding directly to the stomach? Also, as the bird is drinking water itself that is being provided manually, not through the tube, how can the water get past the tube & into it's system if the tube is lodged in the esophagus to the stomach? If a crop sized feeding, 2.5 mg, is forced into the stomach, thereby forcing it into the gizzard without the first step of digestion, & possibly on to the liver, can this cause a bird to bleed out, especially a bird who is in the healing process & whose system is compromised because of such? With the tube in the stomach, head blood would show in the crop, it could not get to the tube & stomach?

I am not asking for a diagnosis of the reason of death. I am asking if my bird could have possibly died due to the migration of this tube that was left too long. Not did it die but could it have.
Submitted: 3 years ago.
Category: Bird Veterinary
Expert:  Dr. Jaime replied 3 years ago.

Dr. Jaime :

Hello and welcome to Just Answer chat! I'm Dr. Jaime and I'd like to help.

Dr. Jaime :

I am very sorry to hear of your loss. If you would like to send the necropsy results to me as a link I could review them and explain them to you. I see that you have many questions and I would like to help clarify them for you.

Dr. Jaime :

The tube feeding into the stomach is not a cause of bleeding unless the tube itself caused trauma. 2.5 mL in a 69 gram bird is most certainly appropriate.

Dr. Jaime :

The water would also be able to get absorbed through the oral cavity, crop, esophagus and proventriculus.

Dr. Jaime :

I am concerned that you were giving Meloxicam- you were not giving this bird 0.5 mL of 0.5 mg/mL solution, right?

Dr. Jaime :

Just using the 0.5 mg/mL concentration?

Dr. Jaime :

what was the amount he or she was given in mL for the pain/inflammation?

Customer :

I understand the necropsy report. That is not the issue.

Customer :

The vet had the syringe marked for the amount to be given to the bird, the discharge report reads as thus"

Dr. Jaime :

It is difficult for me to make comments without reviewing the report and dosages of NSAIDS (meloxicam) given.

Customer :

this is verbatim

Dr. Jaime :

Great- thanks

Customer :

Metacam 0.5mg/ml oral, 3 ml. Give 0.06 cc/ml orally every 12 hours for pain and inflamation

Dr. Jaime :

Perfect

Dr. Jaime :

I would have used the same dose- 0.06 mL orally twice daily of the 0.5 mg/mL solution in this size conure

Customer :

the feeding tube was placed into the crop from behind the head, sutured and had a butterfly attachment to keep it in place

Dr. Jaime :

So to clarify, you are wondering if the tube could have penetrated the ventriculus or other portion of the gi tract and cause a bleed internally?

Dr. Jaime :

And that is routinely how a feeding tube is placed in birds

Customer :

the medicine was to be mixed with the kaytee formula but it was almost impossible as they did not put a needle in the bad so that I could inject the medicine into the syringe to mix it before I pushed the food into the tubing.

Dr. Jaime :

So is it possible that your bird received more than 0.06 mL of the 0.5 mg/mL meloxicam?

Customer :

When I spoke with the vet and told her this, she told me to push the medicine in first, right after the small water push to be sure the tubing was clear, then push the food in, and then the second small water push

Dr. Jaime :

Yes, that is very typical

Dr. Jaime :

or to mix it with the food/enteral feeding

Dr. Jaime :

and then feed, then flush with water/fluids

Customer :

no, but since the tube had migrated to the esophagus leading to the stomach, away from the crop

Dr. Jaime :

Often we will actually deliver food directly into the ventriculus in the case of upper GI (crop) disease

Customer :

the entire amt went directly into the stomach, not the crop to be moved slowly to the stomach

Customer :

yes, I understand that

Dr. Jaime :

and the amount that is instilled generally is the same as in crop feeding

Dr. Jaime :

I'm sorry, I don't think I understand your question... are you asking if the tube was the cause of death?

Customer :

no

Customer :

when you feed by tube, and you feed to the crop you feed a larger quantity of food that when you feed directly to the stomach

Dr. Jaime :

Depending on the species, you can generally feed more food into the crop in doves and pigeons but

Dr. Jaime :

in other birds (psitticines)

Dr. Jaime :

you can feed similar amounts

Customer :

I want to know what the amt would be that you would feed to the stomach of a bird this size and if the amt was too large, how would the system handle this

Dr. Jaime :

safely, in my experience

Dr. Jaime :

the system would allow overflow to go up to the esophagus

Dr. Jaime :

and into the preventriculus

Customer :

how can the stomach, which is much smaller and two parts, handle the larger quantity?

Dr. Jaime :

pro* (sorry)

Dr. Jaime :

it would reflux upward

Dr. Jaime :

into the esophagus and crop (proventriculus)

Customer :

reflux

Dr. Jaime :

generally

Dr. Jaime :

*but

Dr. Jaime :

if the pressure exerted on the syringe was too great

Dr. Jaime :

or if the food was too warm

Dr. Jaime :

there could be trauma to the GI system

Dr. Jaime :

that lead to pathology and/or rupture

Dr. Jaime :

I have instilled several times more than the crop capacity

Dr. Jaime :

into the ventriculus (stomach)

Dr. Jaime :

doing lavages to remove foreign objects

Dr. Jaime :

without rupture

Customer :

I fed him his food warm, not hot, but warm.

Dr. Jaime :

so unless the necropsy report reports a rupture

Dr. Jaime :

I think that the amount instilled is unlikely to have caused a bleed

Customer :

Therein lies another problem

Dr. Jaime :

Not microwaved, right? Food continues to cook after microwaving

Dr. Jaime :

and I have seen terrible results with microwaving enteral formulas

Customer :

the vet who did the necropsy was not thorough, is not avian certified and was remiss

Customer :

no, I only used warm tap water

Dr. Jaime :

Good.

Dr. Jaime :

Did you not submit Squeakie's remains to a pathologist?

Dr. Jaime :

I am a little confused.

Customer :

while he is good to use for minor avian issues, he is not for other things but we do not have a lot of choices here locally.

Customer :

no

Dr. Jaime :

I see.

Customer :

a friend called ahead and had the necropsy scheduled and told them no, I was hysterical. It killed me

Dr. Jaime :

Well, in my experience, I have not seen rupture by instilling a crop sized amount of food directly into the ventriculus.

Dr. Jaime :

And I have done several ventricular lavages.

Dr. Jaime :

I am sure that you have had a very difficult time and I am very sorry for your loss of Squeakie.

Customer :

This little bird would roll over on his back and stick his tongue out and wiggle, he really bought me. I am the outreach director for a non profit and never buy birds unless it is to rescue them and I ended up buying him from petco of all places, I fell in love with him at first sight

Dr. Jaime :

You do not feel that he was ever overdosed nor could have had anything other than facial trauma as the other bird was in his enclosure?

Dr. Jaime :

Oh- how adorable!

Dr. Jaime :

I also work for an avian rescue- happy Avian awareness day- Jan. 5th!

Customer :

he was special. When I went to get him, he was saying, "give me a kiss, give me a kiss" and he would bird cuss me, just bob his head and fuss...I adored him.

Customer :

ahhhh..

Dr. Jaime :

I really wish that I could tell you the cause of death, but without seeing the necropsy results (or the actual remains) I am left with speculation.

Customer :

I am doing a radio interview on Jan 26 for our rescue, we are Parrot Guardian here in NC.

Dr. Jaime :

I know a bird that says that too. It is very heartwrenching.

Dr. Jaime :

Excellent!

Customer :

I wish so much that I had the body sent to Raleigh for further testing..

Dr. Jaime :

I work with MAARS in MN.

Customer :

my friend, and partner in the non profit, had good intentions, she was thinking about me having the body back.

Dr. Jaime :

I like Drury Reavil and also NW Zoopath; however if you would like me to review the report I can give you my thoughts.

Dr. Jaime :

If you have access to his remains you could always submit his organs for histopathology

Dr. Jaime :

with a boarded pathologist

Dr. Jaime :

to look for signs of trauma vs. inflammation, etc.

Dr. Jaime :

Slides can be made and reviewed microscopically to determine this.

Customer :

I do think that the tube slipped into the esophagus and caused trauma that killed him. He changed significantly on Thursday afternoon, and started passing tarry stools shortly thereafter. He died the next morning. When called the vet said to just watch him. I should have taken him in. I regret that. I really do not think that the tubing was necessary. I have learned a lot. He was talking and using the beak, and his tongue. He could easily have been fed with the syringe by mouth. She had planned to keep him on the tube for four weeks.

Dr. Jaime :

(Avian awareness day=National Bird Day; sorry brain freeze)

Dr. Jaime :

The tarry stools signify an upper GI bleed

Dr. Jaime :

(coffee ground blood = digested blood)

Dr. Jaime :

Well, it is possible that he could have been gavage fed, but not syringe fed- I have seen more birds develop pneumonia than anything from syringe only feeding

Customer :

and in a bird, what is considered the upper gi?

Dr. Jaime :

It is possible the tube migrated/or he could have fallen and that could have been all that it took to puncture something;

Customer :

He was wasting away as well

Dr. Jaime :

however the ventriculus is a very muscular organ and not easily traumatized

Dr. Jaime :

I cannot tell you how many birds I have seen with screws, nails, etc. etc. etc. inside their gizzard that they have ground down over time!

Customer :

see, that is my thought as well, something happened. All injury was head and it was healing well, and it was five days after the fact

Dr. Jaime :

So a tiny red rubber feeding tube is not very likely to cause trauma

Dr. Jaime :

but it is possible

Customer :

I don't think that it went that far. It was lodged in the esophagus.

Dr. Jaime :

...nor was he ever overdosed with an NSAID

Dr. Jaime :

now, even the esophagus is unlikely to be a problem

Dr. Jaime :

unless the tube punctured that and severed a major vessel

Dr. Jaime :

or even the liver

Dr. Jaime :

or spleen (very VERY unlikely)

Dr. Jaime :

but the necropsy report reveals none of that?

Customer :

I think that in the process of migrating into there there may have been a problem....the liver, if the food being pushed in was not being properly digested or made ready to digest, could that not cause damage to the liver

Customer :

and also then keep him from the nourishment he needed?

Dr. Jaime :

If the food was not being properly digested he may have had an underlying problem that was just worsened or exasperated by stress/trauma.

Dr. Jaime :

i.e. ABV

Dr. Jaime :

birds in pain also lose weight FAST

Dr. Jaime :

The food you were feeding was Exact?

Dr. Jaime :

This is a very highly digestable food.

Dr. Jaime :

and not likely a problem for the liver to help metabolize

Customer :

With the process of the food being the break down beginning in the stomach with the digestive juices, then the grinding process, if too much was forced into the stomach and this was bypassed, could this have caused the trauma to the liver, etc, and caused the bleed?

Dr. Jaime :

and if he was well hydrated he would be able to move the food easily

Customer :

He was most likely in pain unless the metacam was helping.

Dr. Jaime :

Metacam helps

Dr. Jaime :

for pain and inflammation

Customer :

he had water available, he was to drink on his own

Dr. Jaime :

and he only had minor wounds to beak and face

Dr. Jaime :

and if he was drinking on his own he probably didn't hurt too bad on his face/beak

Customer :

But as we both know it is not approved for use in avians and I was concerned with that when I picked him up

Dr. Jaime :

He was only 2?

Dr. Jaime :

He could have had a virus- most commonly seen in younger birds.

Dr. Jaime :

And it is just coincidental; or like some dogs

Dr. Jaime :

was predisposed to bleeding tendicies

Dr. Jaime :

due to his immune system

Customer :

well, I don't know how much he was drinking. I am trying to remember if he drank a lot, he wanted to ge on my shoulder all the time. I hope that I did not hurt him by allowing that.

Dr. Jaime :

a petco bird isn't likely to have the best immune system or breeding pedigree, IMO

Customer :

He was very healthy, and not exposed to anything

Dr. Jaime :

and is very VERY likely to be exposed to disease

Customer :

well, that is the odd thing, they give their birds all their shots and test them for everything before they sell them, which surprised me.

Dr. Jaime :

conures also have a disease called conure bleeding syndrome

Customer :

oh, really? I have others, what is this disease?

Dr. Jaime :

Well, IME, we have had more birds come in sick to our organization from mass breeders (several sources, all exposed to each other) than private homes

Customer :

I wish I could share him with you. He was so wonderful. I currently have 12 parrots, two of them fostered

Dr. Jaime :

Likely caused by a virus

Dr. Jaime :

I am so sorry for your loss.

Dr. Jaime :

I am sure he was such a delight to have in your life.

Customer :

and no bird is even close to him. I did buy two greencheeks to replace him but they are not squeakie

Dr. Jaime :

12! What a great flock! Lucky birdies.

Customer :

I have MS and he was my best buddy

Dr. Jaime :

You will never replace him; but you will always have his memory.

Dr. Jaime :

I know it sounds cliche, but all of the animals that have affected me are still here; in my thoughts, heart, and pictures.

Dr. Jaime :

And the STORIES!

Dr. Jaime :

Again, if you'd like me to review the necropsy report I'm happy to, but there are many possibilities here.

Customer :

thank you....the last two I took in, and will be the last two that will be part of my flock, were African Greys, one of which harmed Squeakie. The male is 40 and has never had a human. He has been very abused, has one wing and I am his first person in his entire life. He was wild caught and he has come a long way. I can hold him like a baby in my arms now and he kisses me. When the last lady had him came to sign him over, she cried. He just chose me. He will always have a home. He is funny, has a very dry sense of huimor. The greys are so smart, communicate with us and we love them.

Dr. Jaime :

I also have a wild caught grey that I share my home with.

Customer :

The wild caught are different aren't they

Dr. Jaime :

She is amazing. It baffles me that they survived us.

Dr. Jaime :

Yes, very much so.

Customer :

the other grey is so different and was hatched here

Dr. Jaime :

She has even been exposed to some very serious disease and had resistance.

Dr. Jaime :

She doesn't pluck, is very smart and has a very special sense of humor.

Customer :

yes, my old fellow has only one wing and the lost wing was crushed and left that way for a long time. Scott McDonald did several of his six surgeries. He has been in 13 rescues before he came to me.

Dr. Jaime :

Back to your original Squeakie- if there is anything else I can do please let me know. Consider submitting any remains to a board certified avian pathologist; you often can do this directly.

Dr. Jaime :

And if you work with an organization it is likely they will be able to help you submit paperwork.

Customer :

ok, as to that. We buried him.

Customer :

and it was last July

Customer :

Would there be anything of any use there?

Dr. Jaime :

Possibly; tissue can tell us some things; you could have his remains tested for viruses, etc.

Dr. Jaime :

And if it is infectious (i.e. ABV)

Dr. Jaime :

you could know for the remainder of your flock.

Dr. Jaime :

But it is possible that this is traumatic only

Dr. Jaime :

or it is also possible, sadly, that you will not get a final diagnosis.

Customer :

If he had died in the winter, I would think maybe, but he was in the ground in the summer. I made him a burial shroud, and put him in his tent with his picture and then put that in a plastic container with a poem.

Dr. Jaime :

That happens sometimes.

Dr. Jaime :

Oh, that is very sweet.

Dr. Jaime :

I have buried some of my own animals in the winter; after thawing the ground.

Customer :

He was beautiful. My husband made a great grave for him

Dr. Jaime :

It is so hard to lose them.

Customer :

more than I could have ever imagined. I cleaned his cage and he was out on the outside and I missed it.

Dr. Jaime :

I'm so sorry.

Dr. Jaime :

You have a flock of 12 though!

Customer :

He got on the side of the old Greys cage and he bit him and I saw it. It is an awful memory and I feel so gulty

Dr. Jaime :

It happens

Dr. Jaime :

Accidents are terrible and those of us who love multiple animals all at once

Dr. Jaime :

are often the victims of such tragedies

Dr. Jaime :

and beat ourselves up over it!

Customer :

yes, and I love them all...I have a Nanday, three suns, two quakers, an indian ringneck, a cockatiel and the two fancy greencheeks as well as the two greys.

Dr. Jaime :

He was lucky to have such a kind and loving guardian

Dr. Jaime :

and you are very cautious now; and probably a little paranoid.

Dr. Jaime :

It is so unlikely that this accident was the cause of his death.

Dr. Jaime :

I'm a little jealous!

Customer :

I am, and the Greys were sort of new, I had gotten them in Mar and learned a hard lesson

Dr. Jaime :

But there are almost 80 birds at the rescue now; so I can get a flock fix any time.

Dr. Jaime :

It's understandable

Dr. Jaime :

but please don't beat yourself up.

Dr. Jaime :

It was an accident.

Customer :

haha....I think that all totaled we have about 150.

Dr. Jaime :

And you do so much for the birds! They are lucky to have you.

Customer :

ok

Dr. Jaime :

We had over 200 at one point!

Customer :

well, I so appreciate your time. wow, 200. I think that the hardest part is cage cleaning

Dr. Jaime :

I wish I could give you an answer but without records/reports I only have speculations.

Dr. Jaime :

I hope that this has helped you some.

Customer :

I totally clean every day, they all have a large cage and it is hard

Customer :

yes it has

Dr. Jaime :

And bird-bird injuries!

Dr. Jaime :

Toe bites are the pits!

Customer :

haha....my cockatiel is the best at cuticle bites

Dr. Jaime :

I'm glad. Well best wishes for your radio interview and have a great NBD on Jan. 5th!

Customer :

he has never loved being messed with and I have had him 15 years.

Dr. Jaime :

If you ever need assistance in the future, please preface your question with Dr. Jaime-

Customer :

he feels his life has been invaded

Dr. Jaime :

and I'd be happy to help.

Customer :

thank you and the same to you

Dr. Jaime :

Loverbirds are the worse, IMHO.

Customer :

IF for any reason you think of anything that may fit this situation, that may help, please let me know

Dr. Jaime :

LOL bet he is a funny guy!

Dr. Jaime :

I most certainly will, I will have an archive.

Dr. Jaime :

*lovebirds (but loverbirds is appropriate, don't you think, lol)

Customer :

My issue right now is that I want part of what they charged back as a matter of principal to donate to the rescue.

Customer :

hah

Customer :

my greencheeks are really loverbirds

Dr. Jaime :

Ah, wouldn't that be ideal. Maybe just ask them for money and they will donate?

Customer :

they get it on all the time, leaving no need to have them sexed

Dr. Jaime :

Without trying to threaten?

Dr. Jaime :

:D

Dr. Jaime :

I donate all my time to the rescue; most vets are happy to help where they can...

Customer :

they won't. Their business mgr has changed the reason they have no liability over and over. He is sickening

Customer :

He wants me to turn them into the state board.

Dr. Jaime :

Without a solid pathology report, unfortunately I don't know that you'll be able to get anythign

Dr. Jaime :

but if they feel like they did something wrong, maybe they will donate? Or maybe they will donate just because they love birds too!

Customer :

he knows that because there was not a total necropsy done I would not win, but what bothers me is that by doing so, I will put a black mark on the vets record. Win lose or draw, he would be throwing her under the bus

Customer :

My career was as a stock broker and any complaint on my U4 was something i would never want

Dr. Jaime :

Well, that is your call, but do you want to drag your name/their name and possibly the organizations name through the mud? That is a hard question.

Customer :

and she would not want a complaint on her record, regardless of the outcome.

Dr. Jaime :

That is true.

Dr. Jaime :

But you have to be sure... and without being sure I wouldn't go there.

Dr. Jaime :

And it's hard without a complete report... by a pathologist...

Customer :

and any other person who may have a complaint against her, if they see that there has been a complant will file one much quicker.

Dr. Jaime :

Very true. You have thought about this a lot.

Dr. Jaime :

Honestly, it sounds like the vet did a great job medically

Dr. Jaime :

the question is "what happened?"

Dr. Jaime :

was it trauma?

Dr. Jaime :

was it a virus?

Dr. Jaime :

was it the elusive conure bleeding syndrome?

Dr. Jaime :

and the necropsy report is inconclusive?

Customer :

yes, and he knows that. In a civil suit, we would be on a more level playing field because while I may not be able to prove that it was their fault they cannot prove it was not..

Dr. Jaime :

As far as lawsuits go I cannot comment, but the medical treatment from what you have told me is quite appropriate.

Customer :

all he says in the report is that the tube was found in the esophagus leading to the stomach, and that the intestines were filled with a black tarry substance consistent with blood. He felt that the blood may be due to the head injury. His report is stupid. He did not even see he tube at first, so he is really not a good source.

Dr. Jaime :

Well that is something I'd have a pathologist review, at the very least

Dr. Jaime :

to state if that is a good report or not

Dr. Jaime :

tarry blood is digested blood

Dr. Jaime :

I cannot see how that would relate to the head injury

Dr. Jaime :

unless he was injured bodily at the same time as well (i.e. bitten, shaken, liver trauma, etc.)

Customer :

Well, my problem with the treatment is that she said that his frontal bones were crushed and they were not. Nor were any of the bones broken that she said were. She planned to leave the tube in for four weeks and he would not have survived that. And she did not take the bloody stools seriously nor the fact that he was stumbling and acting odd the evening before he died. To me, she was negligent

Dr. Jaime :

Digested blood implies upper gi bleed, ulcers, etc.

Dr. Jaime :

It is VERY hard to say if there is a skull fracture on X-rays of a tiny bird; MRI/CT is required generally for these fractures to be CONFIRMED (but could be suspected on palpation)

Dr. Jaime :

If you think that you should consider pursuing a complaint

Dr. Jaime :

The board will review the treatment, records and post-mortem findings

Customer :

and there was no injury to anything except his head, his beak torn away slightly on the right side and the sinus cavity pierced, nostril destroyed. No head trauma as in brain, no broken bones. The bleeding was minimal, only with beak manipulation for diagnosis.

Dr. Jaime :

Okay

Dr. Jaime :

so i see how she could have thought that the head trauma was

Dr. Jaime :

related to the black tarry stool

Dr. Jaime :

when there is a sinus bleed

Dr. Jaime :

the blood often drains from the choanae

Dr. Jaime :

and gets swallowed

Dr. Jaime :

= digested black tarry blood

Customer :

well, it is late here

Customer :

and I need to go to bed

Dr. Jaime :

But that would be a lot of bleeding over many days

Customer :

and this was five days after the injury

Dr. Jaime :

If you have further questions at any point come back and click reply

Customer :

and it was healed

Dr. Jaime :

otherwise if you are satisfied, click accept at any time.

Dr. Jaime :

Unlikely then.

Dr. Jaime :

Unless a bone shard dislodged or trauma recurred...

Customer :

it all has been horrible.

Dr. Jaime :

so hard to say.

Customer :

none of that.

Dr. Jaime :

It certainly sounds like it.

Customer :

thanks...

Customer :

goodnight

Dr. Jaime :

You are welcome. I'll check back tomorrow if you have further questions.

Customer : I have not accepted this answer yet as I could not find a way to print it out and kneed your credentials along with the dialog we shared
Customer : I could do it now but I am ib bed on my iPad. I will try to get back here and do it tomorrow

JustAnswer in the News:

 
 
 
Ask-a-doc Web sites: If you've got a quick question, you can try to get an answer from sites that say they have various specialists on hand to give quick answers... Justanswer.com.
JustAnswer.com...has seen a spike since October in legal questions from readers about layoffs, unemployment and severance.
Web sites like justanswer.com/legal
...leave nothing to chance.
Traffic on JustAnswer rose 14 percent...and had nearly 400,000 page views in 30 days...inquiries related to stress, high blood pressure, drinking and heart pain jumped 33 percent.
Tory Johnson, GMA Workplace Contributor, discusses work-from-home jobs, such as JustAnswer in which verified Experts answer people’s questions.
I will tell you that...the things you have to go through to be an Expert are quite rigorous.
 
 
 

What Customers are Saying:

 
 
 
  • It was so professional, so personally concerned (as we were) and you answered all of our questions. George and I are so happy that I found "JustAnswer" on my Google search -- you are now in my "Favorites" list! And, yes we do love our kitty - she makes our life complete! Bev & George Boca Raton, FL
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  • It was so professional, so personally concerned (as we were) and you answered all of our questions. George and I are so happy that I found "JustAnswer" on my Google search -- you are now in my "Favorites" list! And, yes we do love our kitty - she makes our life complete! Bev & George Boca Raton, FL
  • Wonderful service, prompt, efficient, and accurate. Couldn't have asked for more. I cannot thank you enough for your help. Mary C. Freshfield, Liverpool, UK
  • This expert is wonderful. They truly know what they are talking about, and they actually care about you. They really helped put my nerves at ease. Thank you so much!!!! Alex Los Angeles, CA
  • Thank you for all your help. It is nice to know that this service is here for people like myself, who need answers fast and are not sure who to consult. GP Hesperia, CA
  • I couldn't be more satisfied! This is the site I will always come to when I need a second opinion. Justin Kernersville, NC
  • Just let me say that this encounter has been entirely professional and most helpful. I liked that I could ask additional questions and get answered in a very short turn around. Esther Woodstock, NY
  • Thank you so much for taking your time and knowledge to support my concerns. Not only did you answer my questions, you even took it a step further with replying with more pertinent information I needed to know. Robin Elkton, Maryland
 
 
 

Meet The Experts:

 
 
 
  • Dr. Pat

    Bird Veterinarian

    Satisfied Customers:

    3246
    25+ years working primarily or exclusively with birds
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  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/BI/birddoctor/2012-6-22_173214_birddoctor.64x64.png Dr. Pat's Avatar

    Dr. Pat

    Bird Veterinarian

    Satisfied Customers:

    3246
    25+ years working primarily or exclusively with birds
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/PC/pcbobber/photo.64x64.JPG Dr. Bob's Avatar

    Dr. Bob

    Veterinarian

    Satisfied Customers:

    2403
    35 years in general practice, including avian.
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/kritrdr/2009-04-09_175809_dr-dan-1_justanswer.jpg Dr. Dan's Avatar

    Dr. Dan

    Avian Veterinarian

    Satisfied Customers:

    1329
    9 years of pet, wildlife, and zoo avian experience
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/fgvs/2009-07-21_182123_michael.jpg Dr. MD Stafford's Avatar

    Dr. MD Stafford

    Veterinarian

    Satisfied Customers:

    233
    20 years in private practice, contract veterinarian Dickerson Park Zoo and attending veterinarian Missouri State University
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/fionasteel/2010-5-15_192530_copy_of_tess_and_lily_001.jpg Fiona Steel's Avatar

    Fiona Steel

    Veterinarian

    Satisfied Customers:

    224
    BVMS MRCVS
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/1I/1ISUDVM/2011-3-1_22028_Honeymoon2005075294928803490646858.64x64.jpg Dr. Bruce's Avatar

    Dr. Bruce

    Veterinarian

    Satisfied Customers:

    185
    12 years of experience as a small animal veterinarian
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/AL/allpetsdr/2012-5-1_11142_IMG29591.64x64.jpg allpetsdr's Avatar

    allpetsdr

    Veterinarian

    Satisfied Customers:

    138
    I have been practicing for 10 years. I work with exotic pets, dogs, cats, small ruminants, camelids and pigs.