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Ask Appliance Tech Dave Your Own Question
Appliance Tech Dave
Appliance Tech Dave, Home Appliance Technician
Category: Appliance
Satisfied Customers: 2539
Experience:  30 years experience specializing in Whirlpool, KitchenAid and Kenmore
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I have a Maytag range purchased new in 2000. Model #

Customer Question

I have a Maytag range purchased new in 2000. Model # *****; S/N 16734345WW.Two times I have had to replace the bake element in the oven. In 2008 and again on 08/01/15. Both times the element had a bright red spot that eventually became white and began giving off sparks. The power was shut off at the circuit breaker. The element continued to smoke and burn white until a audible "bang" and particles of solid black materal were ejected. I kept the oven door closed thinking that lack of oxygen would stop this process, but with no avail. The burning was similar to a magnesium fire, but with its own supply of oxygen.Being an engineer, I'd like your explanation or thoughts on this failure and also have any modifications been made on this element? If so ,what is the new part number? The old number was WP74010750.
My wife and I are retired and probably use this oven an average of once a week.
Sincerely, ***** ***** PE
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Appliance
Expert:  Appliance Tech Dave replied 1 year ago.

Hello Robert, this is Dave. As I suspect you know the bake element works on 240vac. The element I'd constructed with a Nichole conductor in the center surrounded buy a ceramic insulator. This is enclosed in a metal Sheila that is grounded at each end where it is fastened to the liner. There is a "cold pin" attached before the conducted exits the Sheila so that the wire connected to the end terminal does not get hot. When the element heats and cools the center wire moves a little and after years of use it can touch the sheild and that provides full voltage to ground. I will look up the latest part number and provide that in a few minutes.

Expert:  Appliance Tech Dave replied 1 year ago.

The bake element is still the same. Please let me know if you still have questions about this but this is the typical way an element fails.

Expert:  Appliance Tech Dave replied 1 year ago.
Robert, do you still need help? Was the answer clear and complete?
Expert:  Appliance Tech Dave replied 1 year ago.
Robert, I saw that spell checker changed several words into proper names so here is what is should have said. Please let me know you understand.
Hello Robert, this is Dave. As I suspect you know the bake element works on 240vac. The element is constructed with a nickle-chromium conductor in the center surrounded buy a ceramic insulator. This is enclosed in a metal shield that is grounded at each end where it is fastened to the liner. There is a "cold pin" attached before the conducted exits the shield so that the wire connected to the end terminal does not get hot. When the element heats and cools the center wire moves a little and after years of use it can touch the shield and that provides full voltage to ground.
Dave