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Steve G.
Steve G., Handyman
Category: Appliance
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Experience:  Very handy with appliance troubleshooting and repairs.
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I'm an American living in the US,& I just acquired a used Gaggenau

Customer Question

I'm an American living in the US,& I just acquired a used Gaggenau oven designed to operate on 220-240v AC. My outlet is 120v AC, so, obviously, that not going to work for this oven. I have two distinct choices now, as I see it:
A: Have the breaker-panel circuit AND the associated AC outlet rewired to support 220v, which is complicated by the fact that I already have a 120v stove plugged into that two receptacle outlet
Or,
B: not change the wiring at all, but, instead, plug the oven into an external 120-220v STEP-UP transformer/converter of the sort used to make many European appliances work in the US.
It seems to me that choice B might be less expensive, since most electricians in my area charge near $300 to do even minor work like that, and a good step-up converter like that can be bought for less than $100.
The kicker is that my Gaggenau oven has no AC power cord with a European-style 220v plug on it, just raw, heavy-gauge copper wires that are obviously meant to be connected DIRECTLY to a 220v circuit, rather than be plugged into it.
So, my question is, which of the above scenarios seems the best and most cost-effective solution to make this 220v oven work in my 120v home, while still retaining the ability to keep my 120v stove plugged into that outlet, and second, is it possible, and not too difficult, to install a 220v power cord and euro style plug on this oven IN PLACE OF the raw, unterminated wiring now coming out the back of it?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Appliance
Expert:  Steve G. replied 1 year ago.
Hello there and welcome to Just Answer. My name is ***** ***** I will be assisting you today. I am an engineer with over 30 years of electrical and electronic training, repair and installation experience. I will try and answer your question accurately and precisely so that we can get you on your way.
You have left out one very important detail: what is the amp rating or wattage of the oven? It will be listed somewhere on the oven's nameplate or in the manual.
Luckily I was able to find the manual and you need a 16A circuit. This is good. Why? Because assuming that you have #12 conductors to your 120V outlet, you can keep the wiring. You would simply need to change out the single pole breaker to a double pole 20A breaker in the panel and then provide the correct outlet at the range. This not a big deal. The breaker is probably under $20.
Please let me know if you need further help.
Steve
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Hi,No, I'm not sure that I don't have 220v already, but there is only one outlet on that wall, under the stove, and it has a 120v GAS cooktop plugged into it, which I assume means it can't be a 220v outlet, or else it would overpower and damage that 120v cooktop, I'd think. Another very pertinent detail for you to know is that the oven I'm replacing is very old, circa 1970 or so, and it, like my cooktop, is a GAS unit, which only needs electrical power for the mechanical clock, not the heating elements, since it's gas. So, having just thought that through as I typed, I'm pretty sure that yes, the current outlet is configured for 120v only. And I'm now going to be installing a very AC hungry ELECTRIC oven, and therein lies the problem with my current wiring.Anyway, this is what the aluminum panel on the back of the oven says, from left to right, on two separate lines:AC 208/220-240v 60Hz 3100/3700w
43w 45w 100w 18aHope this all helps.Eric
Expert:  Steve G. replied 1 year ago.
I edited my original answer but something happened between me posting it and you reading it - you saw my original info request.
Luckily I was able to find the manual and you need a 16A circuit. This is good. Why? Because assuming that you have #12 conductors to your 120V outlet, you can keep the wiring. You would simply need to change out the single pole breaker to a double pole 20A breaker in the panel and then provide the correct outlet at the range. This not a big deal. The breaker is probably under $20. You would then move the white neutral to the second pole of that breaker. I see no mention of a three wire connection in the manual so you would be good with the two #12 conductors (previously your hot and neutral) and the ground.
Please let me know if you need further help.
Steve
Expert:  Steve G. replied 1 year ago.
Hi there, I see you viewed my answer. Do you have any other questions in regard to this issue? Please let me know and I will be happy to help.
Regards
Steve (working on his birthday).

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