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Diana F.
Diana F., Antiques Appraiser
Category: Antiques
Satisfied Customers: 7910
Experience:  Bachelor of Arts Degree (summa cum laude); 10+ years exp.
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This is one piece I actually bought, but don't recall when

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This is one piece I actually bought, but don't recall when or where. Know nothing about it, but wonder if it is mongoose and cobra. Some kind of unbleached paper. Measures 15" x 19". No signature. Please see photos.
Hayley
Customer: replied 10 days ago.
For Diana F. (Sorry I forgot to include this request initially.)

Hello,

I wanted to let you know that someone has seen your question. We thank you for your patience.

I will opt-out so that the expert can answer when she logs in .

Kind regards,

Rarewares

Customer: replied 10 days ago.
Thank you, ***** ***** apologize for the confusion.

Hi Hayley.

I got this one!

~Diana

Customer: replied 10 days ago.
I think I remember buying it one year during Spoleto. I'm not sure why!?

Hi Hayley,

Have I mentioned how fascinated I am by this one? I'm almost positive it's a temple rubbing. I'm just not sure from where. It's obviously not European, which is where most tend to have been made. It's not Thai or Asian because they didn't quite do a mythological bird like figure quite like yours. It's almost more mesoamerican in design, but I haven't had any luck locating what site it might be have been pulled from.

Customer: replied 6 days ago.
I don't know about temple rubbings, but will look it up now. And mesoamerican, too! Thanks for looking. Please let me know if you discover more.
Hayley
Customer: replied 6 days ago.
There were some Buddhist monks in Charleston for Spoleto at least one year. I don't believe that's the origination, though.
Customer: replied 6 days ago.
Do you think it's possibly Mayan? Perhaps an eagle? I found one bird that is quite similar...

I'm thinking it's a Toltec eagle.

If you see the imagery for the Toltec eagle eating a heart (as gross as that sounds), the depiction is very similar.

Did you get a chance to see the Toltec eagle eating a heart? I think out of everything I found, that image comes closest to what I see in yours

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http://imgur.com/a/87XpY

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I do think that's a framed temple rubbing. Now some of these aren't actually rubbings taken from an actual temple, but rather, they mimic that look and design. I do think yours is from an actual temple, but I just couldn't locate exactly which one.

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I do think it's a Toltec design rather than Mayan, Aztec or any other Mesoamerican culture. For the most part the Toltec culture dominated from about central Mexico (around modern day Hidalgo) between the 10th and 12th centuries CE. It's worth noting that much of their culture is not really a hold-over but a sort of continuation of those that came before, like the Mayans or Olmecs. In fact a lot of their temples and gods bear a striking resemblance to Mayans.

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Rubbings for the most part date back to the 13th century and many of those come out of England. They were originally pulled from stone, put today most of those come from brass plates that replicate the old carvings. You'll find semi-life size rubbings of kings, knights, etc. Less common is that you'll find rubbings taken from temples in Thailand, Cambodia, etc. I've seen a few that are more a Hindu style, but rare. People here do it a lot with tombstones. It's also a handy way to read marks on silver and jewelry. =)

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Rubbings are just that....you literally places your paper over the image and then using a crayon, wax stick or similar medium, you literally rub it across the paper and create an impression of the carving on your paper. It's mostly done by tourists as a souvenir and a lot of sites have stopped allowing it out of fear of damaging the sites. Some tourist places actually sell them already framed and ready to go too.

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Most of these were done around the midcentury. I suspect yours was too. It likely dates to about the 60s..maybe 70s. It's actually well done. It's not an easy practice because it's very easy to press too hard, smudge your crayon, not get and even transfer, etc. What I see in that one means it likely wasn't their first and they did a good job. It's colored evenly while still maintaining the variations in color and tone you typically find. I'm also fond of that color. If the paper is unbleached, it's possibly handmade. It does seem a bit coarse and looks like their might be fibers showing through. It looks like a heavier weight paper.

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While most temple rubbings aren't worth a lot, you do have a few factors in your favor. It's likely Toltec, which is bit unusual, the imagery is definitely unusual, and it's framed well.

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Given all that, it should be worth about $150 to $200.

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I hope this has been helpful to you. I do my best to offer you the most current values and information using the latest guides and recorded sales.
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I look forward to working with you again.
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Have a great day.
~Diana

Diana F., Antiques Appraiser
Category: Antiques
Satisfied Customers: 7910
Experience: Bachelor of Arts Degree (summa cum laude); 10+ years exp.
Diana F. and other Antiques Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 2 days ago.
Sorry for the delay. Busy weekend!

No worries. =) I figured you've been busy with move and getting everything sorted and unpacked. Thanks!