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Doris - dfm925
Doris - dfm925, Pres, Owner Nashville Appraisals Corporation
Category: Antiques
Satisfied Customers: 8109
Experience:  Antiques store owner 10+yrs.Best of Nashville Two Years. Collector 56+yrs.USPAP compliant. Member AOA.Founded part of antiques, silver & art collection at local museum.
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What is a bellows oil painting circa 1913 worth today?

Customer Question

What is a ***** *****ows oil painting circa 1913 worth today?
Submitted: 1 month ago.
Category: Antiques
Expert:  Doris - dfm925 replied 1 month ago.

Hello and welcome! My name is Doris.
I have been an antiques and art collector as well as dealer and appraiser for over 56 years.
I will be pleased to help you.

Photos are almost always required to give an accurate assessment.

Can you send me at least one photo?

To send photos you may use the "add files" in the blue box link on your reply page or the "paper clip" found in the toolbar you see on your reply page.
Please do not send in ZIP format. The jpg or jpeg format works best.

An explanation of this method can be found here:

http://ww2.justanswer.com/help/how-do-i-send-photo-or-file-expert-0

Also, please tell size, not including the frame. Please do not remove from the frame.

Kind regards,
Doris

Customer: replied 1 month ago.
Sorry, no photo. Size, outside of frame is roughly 18 by 24" I is signed Geo Bellows.
Expert:  Doris - dfm925 replied 1 month ago.

What is the subject matter?

Expert:  Doris - dfm925 replied 1 month ago.

I need sight size within frame.

Customer: replied 1 month ago.
New York winter scee of workman removing snow with a two horse wagon. Very typical Bellows subject for the time.
Customer: replied 1 month ago.
Sorry, about my typing. I am a one finger typist at best.
Customer: replied 1 month ago.
The size I provided is if the picture. Were to be removed from the frame.
Expert:  Doris - dfm925 replied 1 month ago.

I am a one finger typist as well.

Thank you for the information. It really helps.

Please allow me time to research the data required by your question, calculate current values and write my answer.

I want you to have the best answer.

I thank you in advance for your patience.

Kind regards,

Doris

Expert:  Doris - dfm925 replied 1 month ago.

You may have already seen this; but, just in case you have not, I will include it here.

George Wesley Bellows (1882-1925)

Born in Columbus, Ohio, ***** *****ows was a major American artist of the early 20th century, known for his paintings of boxing match figures and for his lithographs, numbering nearly two hundred, of his paintings. He became an instructor in New York at the Art Students League and at the Art Institute of Chicago.

He graduated from Ohio State University in 1903 and then attended the New York School of Art where he studied with Robert Henri, ***** ***** Miller, and Hardesty Gilmore Maratta. Henri inspired him to treat urban subjects in a realist, painterly manner, and between 1906 and1913, he produced a number of scenes from New York life that defined his fine arts career. In 1908, he won a prize at the annual show at the National Academy of Design, the first of many honors during his life. Bellows also worked as a newspaper and magazine illustrator and won early acclaim for those activities.

He was elected to the National Academy of Design, but he was part of the group that rebelled against them in 1919 with the Exhibition of Independent Artists and the1913 Armory Show.

In 1920, he settled in Woodstock, New York where he purchased property next to his good friend Eugene Speicher and lived during the summers until his early death from a ruptured appendix in 1925."
Source:
Matthew Baigell, Dictionary of American Art
Michael David Zellman, 300 Years of American Art

When assessing an artist's work, appraisers must look at completed sales of works by the same artist. Art gallery sales prices are private.
We must then go to auction sales prices which are public. When using comparable work by the same artist, medium, subject matter and size are factors to be considered.
Appraisers most often use price per square inch of previously sold comparable works by the same artist as a measure of value.

Using this widely accepted method of assessment, I was able to determine an estimated auction value of $700,000 - 1,000,000 for your Bellows oil painting assuming good condition and depending on sale geographic location. A very detailed, very large oil by Bellows sold for over $27,000,000 at auction. If yours is also very detailed, it could go well over $1,000,000. Without a photo, I cannot judge the details.

As for retail value, I have seen art sell for 4 to 5 times auction values depending on the tastes of the art gallery owner as well as location of the gallery.

In general, a private seller to a dealer, via consignment or at auction can expect 30-60% of estimated retail value.

Insurance replacement values are usually about 10% more than retail values.

If you wish to sell, these are my suggestions -

The internet has your widest pool of buyers. To sell close to estimated retail try the following -

Try ads on sites such as

https://www.artbrokerage.com/help/selling-art

http://www.rubylane.com/art

http://www.askart.com/Ads_Individual.aspx

https://www.artnet.com/auctions/all-artworks/?utm_campaign=bannerad&utm_source=080514auctionsevergreen&utm_medium=link

http://www.artvalue.com

http://www.artprice.com/marketplace/sell-an-artwork

Some like Etsy.com where you can set up your store for free and the selling fees are small - 20 cents to list an item plus 3.5% of the final price.

Or list with no fees whatsoever:

http://forum.findartinfo.com/default.asp?CAT_

I hope I have helped you.

If I can help you with further questions about this answer, please let me know before you rate me.

All my answers are quoted in USA dollars.

I endeavor to give realistic, honest answers in a timely manner.

Please take a little time to give me a POSITIVE RATING NOW SO THAT I AM CREDITED BY JA for my knowledge, time and effort.

Please do not rate me down because of system difficulty.

Please let me know if you have difficulty with the site's rating system. To rate me, you should see 5 stars near my answer. 5 stars gives me the best rating.

Kind regards.

Doris

If you would like to use me on any future questions, requesting me expires in a short time. If you put "For Doris Only" as the first of three words of the question, most professionals on the site will respect that request.

Customer: replied 1 month ago.
Time for bed. I shall look for an answer in the morning. Thank You
Expert:  Doris - dfm925 replied 1 month ago.

I completed my answer.

Please consider giving me a POSITIVE RATING. It is the only way I AM CREDITED BY JUST ANSWER for my knowledge, time and work.
You should see five stars. This is where you rate me.

Customer: replied 1 month ago.
Thank You ***** information on Bellows was kindly included, but, I should have mentioned that my Great-Grand-Father was a patron of Bellows. He purchased this painting from the painter. Another Bellows my Great Grand-Father purchased was donated by him to the Metropolitan Museum of Art of which he was a Life Fellow.Were I ever to sell this picture, or any other for that matter, I cannot imagine that I would be advertising on the internet. I suspect that Sotheby's or Christie's would be invoved. I was merely curious.
Expert:  Doris - dfm925 replied 1 month ago.

Understood. I am surprised you did not invest in an ISA or ASA local appraiser to obtain an assessment. If you wish to have this type of assessment, please tell me
where you live so that I may suggest one such appraiser within driving distance By all means, go to Christie's or Sotheby's to sell your fine painting. A Wyeth that I assessed
sold for an excellent price at a less well-known auction. All the auction house now accept internet bids as well.

Kind regards,
Doris

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