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Wayne
Wayne, Auctioneer
Category: Antiques
Satisfied Customers: 3909
Experience:  40 yrs. experience in antiques, jewelry, coins and paintings - ASA 1985
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How can I find out how much an autograph is worth ?

Customer Question

How can I find out how much an autograph is worth ?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Antiques
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Mike Mansfield autograph
Expert:  Wayne replied 1 year ago.
Hi,
Thank You for your question, my name is***** am a verified expert and will be working with you today.
***** *****ph "Mike" Mansfield (March 16, 1903 – October 5, 2001) was an American politician and diplomat. A member of the Democratic Party, he served as a U.S. Representative (1943–1953) and a U.S. Senator (1953–1977) from Montana. He was the longest-serving Senate Majority Leader, serving from 1961 to 1977. During his tenure, he shepherded Great Society programs through the Senate and strongly opposed the Vietnam War.
His Autographs are selling for $30-50 at auction. Signed on stationary or on documents sell for higher prices.
Thank you,
Wayne
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
So if it was on a united States Senate 88th congress official program it could be worth more?
Expert:  Wayne replied 1 year ago.
Hi,
Yes this would add to the value because people collect programs as well.
I looked at this again and noticed the date on the bottom. This was the day that JFK was killed. November 22,1963 most likely printed as a souvenier. I think this could add significant value. This could sell for $300-500 if marketed this way. Here is some history.
On November 22, 1963, the Senate convened at noon and, following a prayer by Chaplain Frederick Brown Harris, proceeded to Executive Session to consider several nominations. After resuming consideration of legislative business, several senators spoke about pending legislation. Following the Senate custom of freshmen senators taking turns as presiding officer, Senator Edward Kennedy took the chair at 12:15 p.m. Senator Wayne Morse of Oregon began speaking on a bill to amend the Library Services Act. Several other senators made supportive statements, including Winston Prouty of Vermont, who was speaking when he was interrupted by Senator Morse. Still at the presiding officer’s desk, Senator Kennedy had just received word that his brother, President John F. Kennedy, had been shot. The junior senator from Massachusetts quickly left the chamber. News of the events in Dallas spread through the chamber and Senator Morse asked the Senate to yield for an emergency. Several minutes later, Senator Spessard Holland of Florida took the chair as Majority Leader MIKE MANSFIELD hurriedly tried to dispense with the business at hand. Senator Morse again interrupted. “If ever there was an hour when all Americans should pray,” he stated simply, “this is the hour.” At 1:55 p.m., Leader Mansfield called for a recess. The Senate reconvened at 2:10 p.m., with 69 senators present, to hear Chaplain Harris deliver a prayer.
Thank you,
Wayne