How JustAnswer Works:

  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.

Ask Glenda B. Your Own Question

Glenda B.
Glenda B., Antiques Appraiser
Category: Antiques
Satisfied Customers: 15762
Experience:  40+ yrs. Experience, 40+yrs.Dealer buying/selling antiques.14+ yrs. Antique Store Owner. Member of AOA, AADA. Advanced studies in Antiques at University of Arkansas at Little Rock.
53729464
Type Your Antiques Question Here...
Glenda B. is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

I have inherited a large set of Noritake Nippon Toki Kaisha

Resolved Question:

I have inherited a large set of Noritake Nippon Toki Kaisha dinnerware and wonder it's worth. There are no other id'ing markings on it, it was my parents "good china" and they were married in approx 1954. Thanks
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Antiques
Expert:  Glenda B. replied 1 year ago.

Hi my name is Glenda,
Thank you for choosing us for your Appraisal needs.

.

Can you tell me what pieces you have in this and how many? Can you describe the pattern?

Glenda

Customer: replied 1 year ago.

Hi Glenda, thank you for your help. I will need to do a pc/# XXXXX for you, so I'll need a few minutes, but in the meantime I can email you a photo, but I think I need your direct email address to do so...

Expert:  Glenda B. replied 1 year ago.

Sharon

That would be great, and be sure to email the pictures just like this.

.

Send the picture to ,XXX@XXXXXX.XXX ,

.

in the subject line put " Pictures for Glenda B in Antiques"

.

in the body of the message put , your user name and name, make sure to send these from the same address that you registered with just answer with ,

.

so they know who you are. They will forward them to me and as soon as I get them I will contact you. The pictures cannot be larger then 1mb.

Glenda

Expert:  Glenda B. replied 1 year ago.

Hi Sharon,

.

I got the image of the set, I will see if I can find a pattern name. I can find the value, I will just have to match the images with images in my China Books. Most of these sets never had pattern names, they were given numbers and most times that was not marked on the pieces. Over time dealers and collectors started calling sets this or that and then it became the name when put in price guides but, 90% never had pattern names from the factories.

.

I will go see what I can find for you, for this.

.

From Noritake
>
> 12- 10" Dinner Plates
> 12- 7-1/2" Salad Plates
> 12- 6-1/2" Bread Plates
> 11- 8" Salad Bowls
> 10- 5-1/2" Small Bowls
> 6- Coffee Cups (+1 w/broken arm)
> 10- 6" Saucers
> 1- Coffee Creamer
> 1- Sugar Bowl (missing lid)
> 1-Gravy Boat
> 1-10-1-2" Serving Dish/Bowl
> 1- 12" Platter

Expert:  Glenda B. replied 1 year ago.

Hi Sharon,

.

The Set is from the 1940's-1950's, here is a bit of history for you, so you can read about the company that created this china.

.

Beside running a china decorating facility of their own during 1878 to 1884,
the Morimura brothers also bought and distributed porcelain blanks to be
decorated by independent porcelain decorators in nearby regions. From 1884
Morimura Kumi subcontracted decorating firms in Tokyo, Nagoya and Kyoto. The
quality of the Early Noritake wares varied with the skill of the individual
decorators. The early marks from this period seems to have been the country of
origin i.e Ni hon or "Nippon" written by brush in traditional Japanese
Kanji characters. The word "Nippon " also meaning Japan but in western
characters

.

A visit by Ichizaemon Morimura IV to the World Fair in Paris in this period
helped shape the idea of trying to manufacture a high quality, modern, western
style dinnerware for export, in Japan. In January 1, 1904 the Nippon Toki
Kaisha Ltd
- the forerunner to the present Noritake Company - was
formed. The factory was located near a source of good and plentiful raw
materials and in a community rich with skilled potters. The site was the small
village of Noritake near Nagoya, the center of Japan's ceramic production, on
the main island of Honshu. The first Japanese registry for a Noritake back stamp
is reported as 1908 for use in Japan.

.

In 1910 the first china products from the new company could leave Japan for
the U.S. The first reported U.S. registry for a Noritake back stamp for
importing is 1911. Not not until 1914 after a long series of trials and errors
the first fine porcelain dinnerware suitable for export was produced. On of the
first patterns to be produces was the "Sedan" (11292). A piece of the dinnerware
in the Noritake factory in Nagoya shows this to be a bleak white plate with a
cream border of small flower sprays and the typical Noritake back stamp, the
letter "M" in a wreath and the words "Hand painted." As a general rule the
earliest dinnerware plates were mostly decorated with a liberal applications of
gold. To identify the early Noritake porcelain, it is important to remember
their intended adaptation to the western taste. The "M in a wreath" mark was
used between c 1914 until 1940.

.

With the first World War came the understanding of the need for
industrialization. The company soon undertook the production of necessary
machinery for the use in its potteries and could by the early 1920's introduce
assembly line techniques allowing for mass production of high quality, yet
affordable, dinnerware.

.

From around the 1890's until 1921 the Nippon Toki Kaisha Ltd had
according to the the McKinley Tariff Act of 1890 marked their export porcelain
with their country of origin as in "Nippon" but in western characters, which is
kind of fun in an upstanding Edo period Samurai way. For "Nippon" collectors the
bad news is that this mark only signifies the country of origin and implies no
other information. So, even if early Morimura imports were likely to have been
marked this way, so would other imports from Japan too. After the WWI most back
stamps was changed to state "Japan" or "Made in Japan". Still the word Nippon
was infrequently used even after 1921.

.

The 1921-1941 Period

The period from 1921 until 1941 is a time easily set apart in Noritake
production. It is clearly defined on both ends by two events: a change in U.S.
law in 1921 and the entry into World War II in 1941.

.

Until 1921 Noritake predominately marked export wares "Nippon," one word used
to describe the country of Japan. In 1921 American import law changed to require
the place of origin be marked on a product in English. Since Nippon was an
adaptation of a description of the island country in the native language, Nippon
was no longer acceptable under the new law. Backstamps after 1921 state "Japan"
or "Made in Japan."

.

From the event of the back stamps giving up the "Nippon" mark and beginning
with being marked "Japan" or "Made in Japan. i.e. in the early 1920's we can
assume that all Noritake porcelain were actually designed in New York, for the
US market. From the up market art deco designs of the late 1920s the designs of
the 1930s took a markedly more pragmatic shape after the world-wide depression.
Still, marketed in department stores and Five & Dimes, Noritake took "art
deco" into Americas homes and onto their tables. Much of the "lusterware" where
a thin metallic film was applied over a bright single-color glaze, often with
art deco theme decals in combination with hand painting, dates to this period.

From its early understanding of western taste and mass production, Noritake
also early understood the western methods of mass marketing. It is thus not
surprising to from the late 1920's throughout the 1930's, until the bombing of
Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 put a most unwanted stop to normal business,
"Hand Painted Imported Noritake China" was offered as a premium by the Larkin
company of Buffalo, New York, to its millions of customers purchasing soap,
beauty and home products by mail. Some patterns appears to have been specially
designed for the Larking company such as the "Azalea". Azalea was then sold as
premiums to the Larkin club members and their home agents. Typical marks from
the period c. 1925 to 1940 is the green Noritake mark #190.

.

In 1941 the export offices were closed and direct export to the US was not
resumed before 1948. Noritake wares from circa 1948 to 1952 may bear a number of
marks including "Made in Occupied Japan" and "Occupied Japan." In 1963 the
company started to use its English name Noritake Company Ltd to which the
Japanese company also officially changed its name in 1981.

.

Early Noritake china dinnerware featured the "Hand Painted Nippon" design
around the familiar wreath-circled "M" for "Morimura" on the back stamp of most
pieces.

.

"Noritake" appears on back stamps of other pieces, with either "Japan" or
"Made in Japan" present on most of these. For a period following World War II
from 1945 to 1948 Noritake China was sold under the label "Rose China". In 1953
the letter "N" for "Noritake" in a wreath replaced the long used "M" in a
wreath. From 1945 until early 1952, occupation of Japan by the Allied Occupation
Forces had been in place and many backstamps for this period say "Made in
Occupied Japan. According to collectors, the number of known different Noritake
marks are today more then 400.

.

Marks with the initials RC have a special place in the Noritake production.
The first time we find them in the first marks registered in Japan in the 1908,
where RC (Royal Crockery) is combined with a "Yajirobe" or a mechanical balance
toy. According to Noritake symbolizing the universal problem of finding a
balance in business, such as between quality and price. It is not clear how long
this symbol was used but already in 1911 the first marks with the famous laurel
wreath was registered. In 1911 also a series of circular marks with the RC drawn
in an Art Noveu style were registered in Japan. In 1926 a back stamp with RC
(Royal Crockery) with a right turned laurel twig registered in India for India
and Southeast Asian market was used for the first time.

.

Immediately after the second WW, in 1946, the Noritake was temporary dropped
from the marks and RC was reappearing as "Rose China" together with a picture of
a rose and the words Made in Japan. Since the quality immediately after the war
was not up to the pre-war standard, Noritake preferred to save the valuable
Noritake brand name until later, still already in the 1947 we find the Noritake
name used together with the Komaru (overcoming difficulties) symbol, sometimes
over the telltale line "Made in Occupied Japan".
.

The Noritake Nippon Toki Kaisha dinnerware has an estimated value on the secondary retail market for an of average of 65.00-70.00 per 5pc place setting ( dinner, Bread and Butter, Salad, Cup and Saucer) with these extras being - 8" Salad Bowls-$14.50-15.00 each, 5-1/2" Small Bowls-$12.50 each, Coffee Creamer-22.50-30.00, Sugar Bowl (missing lid)- 25.00, Gravy Boat-55.00-65.00, 10-1-2" Serving Dish/Bowl-35.00-40.00, 12" Platter- 70.00, depending on the condition and where it is for sale at. These will typically sell higher in an Antique Shop or Private sale compared to an auction. If you are thinking of selling, you might want to check your local Antique Shops in the area to see what yours or one like it would sell for or has sold for, then you can decide to sell online or locally. As antiques and collectibles are subject in selling price to different areas across the country..( Larger Metropolitan Areas bring higher prices then Smaller Cities. )

.

If you plan on selling this I would list this for sell on the internet where it will have the largest shopping market. There are some great sites you can sell from.

.

You can sell in your local area or a larger city near you with Craigslist, it is free, and when they item sells the buyer picks it up. You can sell on Etsy, which is a great place to sell from, you list Vintage Items, they can stay until they sell. Much like having a little store online. There is Amazon and of course Ebay. All of these sites get you a lot of World Wide exposure and bring the best traffic. They are all great! If you sell to a dealer or antique or resell shop you can expect to get about 30-40% of what it is worth since they have to resell the item.

.

If I can be of any further help, please feel free contacting me, if there is a problem with my answer please feel free contacting me before leaving a negative feedback, any problem can be resolved.

.

New Rating System, Explanation: Please Rate Me Only, not the Website. Also, please rate my service to you not the price I have to report, I cannot control

current values of an item, we use the most up todate data bases, references and research material.

.

I am a appraiser who is a user of the site to answer questions for customers who come here. I do my very best to offer you the most current values and any information I can find for you.

.

A rating of one of the top 3 smileySmilefaces lets JustAnswer/Pearl know I did my job, this is the only way I am paid and credited for my time, at no dditional cost to the you. A good feed back rating ( not, "Bad Service" or "Poor Service" ) it is very much apreciated, unless you do not feel a good feedback is warranted. Please let me know what else I can do for you, ( if anything ) to help improve my feedback by, clicking on the "Continue the Conversation Link". My good rating is very important to me and something I strive to keep.

.

And if you would like to use me on any further questions. It works much better putting my name ( Glenda ) in your question , then I will be sure to get it. Requesting me expires in just a short time.

.

It has been a pleasure working for you, I look forward to it again.

Thank you so much

Glenda

Customer: replied 1 year ago.

Thank you so much for all your help! Your timing and informational response was just what we were looking for! Happy Holidays to you and yours!! Sharon

Expert:  Glenda B. replied 1 year ago.

Sharon

You are very welcome.

Happy Holidays to you also.

.

If I can be of any further help, please feel free contacting me, if there is a problem with my answer please feel free contacting me before leaving a negative feedback, any problem can be resolved.

.

New Rating System, Explanation: Please Rate Me Only, not the Website. Also, please rate my service to you not the price I have to report, I cannot control

current values of an item, we use the most up todate data bases, references and research material.

.

I am a appraiser who is a user of the site to answer questions for customers who come here. I do my very best to offer you the most current values and any information I can find for you.

.

A rating of one of the top 3 smileySmilefaces lets JustAnswer/Pearl know I did my job, this is the only way I am paid and credited for my time, at no dditional cost to the you. A good feed back rating ( not, "Bad Service" or "Poor Service" ) it is very much apreciated, unless you do not feel a good feedback is warranted. Please let me know what else I can do for you, ( if anything ) to help improve my feedback by, clicking on the "Continue the Conversation Link". My good rating is very important to me and something I strive to keep.

.

And if you would like to use me on any further questions. It works much better putting my name ( Glenda ) in your question , then I will be sure to get it. Requesting me expires in just a short time.

.

It has been a pleasure working for you, I look forward to it again.

Thank you so much

Glenda

Glenda B., Antiques Appraiser
Category: Antiques
Satisfied Customers: 15762
Experience: 40+ yrs. Experience, 40+yrs.Dealer buying/selling antiques.14+ yrs. Antique Store Owner. Member of AOA, AADA. Advanced studies in Antiques at University of Arkansas at Little Rock.
Glenda B. and other Antiques Specialists are ready to help you

JustAnswer in the News:

 
 
 
Ask-a-doc Web sites: If you've got a quick question, you can try to get an answer from sites that say they have various specialists on hand to give quick answers... Justanswer.com.
JustAnswer.com...has seen a spike since October in legal questions from readers about layoffs, unemployment and severance.
Web sites like justanswer.com/legal
...leave nothing to chance.
Traffic on JustAnswer rose 14 percent...and had nearly 400,000 page views in 30 days...inquiries related to stress, high blood pressure, drinking and heart pain jumped 33 percent.
Tory Johnson, GMA Workplace Contributor, discusses work-from-home jobs, such as JustAnswer in which verified Experts answer people’s questions.
I will tell you that...the things you have to go through to be an Expert are quite rigorous.
 
 
 

What Customers are Saying:

 
 
 
  • Wonderful service, prompt, efficient, and accurate. Couldn't have asked for more. I cannot thank you enough for your help. Mary C. Freshfield, Liverpool, UK
< Last | Next >
  • Wonderful service, prompt, efficient, and accurate. Couldn't have asked for more. I cannot thank you enough for your help. Mary C. Freshfield, Liverpool, UK
  • This expert is wonderful. They truly know what they are talking about, and they actually care about you. They really helped put my nerves at ease. Thank you so much!!!! Alex Los Angeles, CA
  • Thank you for all your help. It is nice to know that this service is here for people like myself, who need answers fast and are not sure who to consult. GP Hesperia, CA
  • I couldn't be more satisfied! This is the site I will always come to when I need a second opinion. Justin Kernersville, NC
  • Just let me say that this encounter has been entirely professional and most helpful. I liked that I could ask additional questions and get answered in a very short turn around. Esther Woodstock, NY
  • Thank you so much for taking your time and knowledge to support my concerns. Not only did you answer my questions, you even took it a step further with replying with more pertinent information I needed to know. Robin Elkton, Maryland
  • He answered my question promptly and gave me accurate, detailed information. If all of your experts are half as good, you have a great thing going here. Diane Dallas, TX
 
 
 

Meet The Experts:

 
 
 
  • Doris

    Antiques Appraiser

    Satisfied Customers:

    676
    Antiques store owner 10+yrs, collector 55+yrs, USPAP cert. member of AOA - specialist in antique silver and British smalls.
< Last | Next >
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/dfm925/2010-10-28_030928_DFMBEST3.jpg Doris's Avatar

    Doris

    Antiques Appraiser

    Satisfied Customers:

    676
    Antiques store owner 10+yrs, collector 55+yrs, USPAP cert. member of AOA - specialist in antique silver and British smalls.
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/AntiquesExpert/2010-11-25_183723_img_6068.jpg AntiquesExpert's Avatar

    AntiquesExpert

    Accredited Appraiser

    Satisfied Customers:

    74
    Accredited Member of ISA; passed USPAP; full time appraiser; collector for 20+ years
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/TI/timlukefrac/2010-11-11_114825_timweb.jpg Tim Luke's Avatar

    Tim Luke

    Antiques and Collectibles Researcher

    Satisfied Customers:

    8
    Accredited appraiser, former Director at Christie's, seen on HGTV's
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/jmdunmire/2010-10-10_125004_jul_auctionneer.jpg JM Dunmire's Avatar

    JM Dunmire

    Antiques and Collectibles Researcher

    Satisfied Customers:

    5
    I am an auctioneer who has been dealing in the antiques business for over 25 years.
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/BL/blueflowers1063/2013-10-10_35834_KimHolidays1.64x64.jpg Kim D.'s Avatar

    Kim D.

    Certified Appraiser & Antiques Expert

    Satisfied Customers:

    4547
    24 Yr Decorative & Fine Art, Historic Objects Expert, CAGA, AOA
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/CA/CAssoc/2013-8-21_181945_randi.64x64.jpg C&A Appraisals (Randi)'s Avatar

    C&A Appraisals (Randi)

    Antiques and Collectibles Researcher

    Satisfied Customers:

    1454
    ISA Certified fully accredited USPAP. 30+years experience. Speaker, TV, Radio, Newspaper Featured.
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/MS/MsDaisy/mom.64x64.jpg Glenda B.'s Avatar

    Glenda B.

    Antiques Appraiser

    Satisfied Customers:

    11160
    40+ yrs. experience buying and selling antiques as a collector and 14+ yrs. as antique store owner. Member of AOA and AADA. Advanced studies in antiques at University of Arkansas at Little Rock.