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Diana F.
Diana F., Antiques Appraiser
Category: Antiques
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Experience:  Bachelor of Arts Degree (summa cum laude); 10+ years exp.
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what is the value of limoge theodore haviland, france , patent

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what is the value of limoge theodore haviland, france , patent applied for, dinner plate?
Hi and thanks for choosing Just Answer.


Can you describe the mark on the back? What color is it?

What does your pattern look like? Do you just have the 1 plate?


Thanks,
Diana
Customer: replied 4 years ago.

spells out Theodore Haviland

Limoge France

Patent applied for

theodore is underlined and is in red..

the pattern is little pink flowers and green leaves and gold rim.

Thanks.

Based on the mark it should date to around 1905 to 1915. Based in my records your dinner plate should have a secondary market value in the range of $35 to $45.

For selling, Craigslist is a worthy shot because it's free. Etsy and Amazon are turning about to be a great alternative to Ebay. http://www.bonanza.com and http://www.artfire.com are pretty good up and coming online sites. Etsy has fantastic rates. It's about 20 cents to list and they only take 3.5% of the final price.


You might check out the consignment cost with any local antique shops. Some places charge about 25% to 30% of final sell price, but in dealing local you generally have less competition. It's always worth checking out.

Ebay is more or less a last resort. It does reach a lot of people, but the values tend to be lower. You will always get a higher value by selling it yourself as opposed to an auction or selling it to a dealer.

If I can be of any further help or if you have anymore questions, don't hesitate to contact me.

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If you would like to use me on any further questions. Requesting me expires in just a short time. If you put my name (DianaF) in the question, that will make sure it gets to me.

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I look forward to working with you again.

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Have a great night!

~Diana

Customer: replied 4 years ago.
Here is the patterngraphicgraphic
Thanks.

That is the mark from 1905 to 1915.

It more than likely doesn't have a name. Well...it would have, but those records are long gone. It might have a Schleiger Number, which means there's no set name, like Princess, and there will be a number attached to the pattern, like Schleigar 335 or Schleiger 115-A.

In the late 1930's and early 1940's, Arlene Schleiger of Omaha, Nebraska was trying to find pieces to fill in her mother's set of china. She couldn't find names, numbers, or any info to figure out what was what. She figured out there was a need to have a common means or method to identify them, so she created one.

She assigned a number to the patterns as she entered them in her book. The term Schleiger Number was started.

It's not complete and by no means, perfect. Some collectors follow it, some don't. Sadly, you'll find the same pattern listed 4 different ways on 4 different sites. Which makes it so much fun for the rest of us.

I'll be honest, the main questions for valuing Haviland are, which Haviland made it, the age, the type of pattern (floral rim, lattice or basket wave, solid color, gold, etc.), the style of the plate (embossed, scalloped, etc.), and if an artist actually signed the designs. That's compared with the current market and what we find in sales and databases.


I can tell you that it's very similar to the Sch. 800 series and a bit like the Trianon pattern. The plate shape looks to be a Theo shape which would fit the period of mark.

I wish I could say the value will be much higher. As for the value, based on my records off all the other 800 series and patterns using the Theo blanks from teh same period, a single dinner plate. $35 to $45 is the average value of similar recorded patterns from the same time frame.

If I can be of any further help or if you have anymore questions, don't hesitate to contact me.

.

Please make sure to rate my answer, choose a smile or star if I have been of any help, since this is the only way we are compensated. A good feedback or rating lets Just Answer / Pearl know that I did a good job and therefore I get compensated for my time and work. It's very much appreciated.
.
If there is a problem with my answer or you don't feel it I deserve a good feedback or rating, please contact me before leaving any neutral or negative feedback. I want to do everything I can to make sure you're satisfied.

.

If you would like to use me on any further questions. Requesting me expires in just a short time. If you put my name (DianaF) in the question, that will make sure it gets to me.

.

I look forward to working with you again.

.

Have a great night!

~Diana



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