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Anna
Anna, Koi Keeping-expert
Category: General
Satisfied Customers: 11133
Experience:  Biology degree, 35 years fishkeeping experience
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my aerator broke in my Koi pond...I have 2 large

Customer Question

my aerator broke in my Koi pond...I have 2 large Koi...can't get pump fixed for 1 week...will they survive?

Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Koi Keeping
Expert:  Anna replied 1 year ago.
Hello,

I apologize that no one has responded to your question sooner. Different experts come online at various times. I just came online and saw your question. My name is ***** ***** I’m a biologist with a special interest in fish. I'm sorry to hear of this incident.

The answer to your question depends on several variables, so there is no simple yes or no. Water temperature is a big factor because the warmer the temperature, the less oxygen the water will hold, and the more your fish will require. If you live in one of the areas suffering from heat, the chances of your koi surviving will go down. A related factor is how deep your pond is. The deeper the pond, the cooler the water will stay. If you have live plants in the pond, that will help, too.

The other big factor is total gallons. With excellent filtration, it is recommended to have at least 250 gallons per mature koi. However, at that rate, they will not survive very long without aeration. At 1000 gallons per koi, the chances of survival increase quite a bit.

So, if you have 1000 gallons per koi and the water temperature is below 80*F, chances of survival are good. If you have 250 gallons per koi and a temp over 80*F, chances of survival are slim. Conditions in between these two extremes will lead to varying chances.

There are things you can do to help. Cut way back on feeding - perhaps just feed once during that week. If the pond is in the sun, rig up some shade (old sheets, a cloth tarp, etc.) to keep the water temperature down. Finally, consider buying an inexpensive pump just for such an emergency. You can connect it to a bubbler to provide a little aeration. A water change mid-week may also help.

If you have more questions, let me know in a REPLY. I wish I could give you a definite answer, but this is a situation where there isn't one. You'll have to evaluate all your conditions, then decide what to do.

Anna

My goal is to provide you with excellent service – if you feel you have gotten anything less, please reply back, I am happy to address follow-up questions. Please remember to rate my service only after you have all the information you need. Thank you!

Expert:  Anna replied 1 year ago.
I just saw your second question, but will close it out so you won't be charged twice. The small aerator will help, but all the factors I discussed above will still make a difference. The most important one is probably your pond's number of gallons.